Jewelry Collection Stories: @homeoftheland

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Today’s latest installment of Jewelry Collection Stories comes from Jemima who we all know in our jewelry community as @homeoftheland. I love her taste in jewelry and her personal collection reflects just that! She isn’t afraid to wear bold pieces and I’ve enjoyed connecting her with the seller of one of her most exquisite pieces–the elongated diamond ring. I’ll let her tell you about her collection, take it away:

I inherited the jewelry fever from my mother who is pragmatic and no-nonsense in most every other way but still wants her jewels. My father was happy to oblige her with some beautiful antique pieces they picked out together for special occasions and she has no qualms about filling the gaps in her collection herself. She recently bought an outrageous Edwardian emerald and diamond three stone ring at the Hillsborough Antique Show that I lust after constantly. I collected vintage Gucci bags from the 1960’s and 1970’s for many years (I still own and love them) before I started to transition more to jewelry over a decade ago when I could afford some of the pieces I wanted.

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There is something I love in every era but I always look for big, evocative, narrative pieces. I did visuals for retailer Anthropologie for a very long time and jewelry is an integral part of my bougie-boho aesthetic. Dainty pieces just disappear on me (although I love admiring them on other people). I love figurative animal jewelry and have acquired everything from Victorian snakes to a 1980’s Kieselstien-Cord alligator ring to my contemporary Elsa Peretti scorpion necklace. Another one of my favorite pieces is a long Edwardian diamond ring that I first lusted over on a fellow Instagramer. When Danielle at Gem Gossip posted that the owner was letting it go, I jumped on it.

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There have been studies that people get more gratification from spending money on experiences rather than objects. To me beautiful jewelry is both an object and an experience every time you wear it. Rings are my favorite because you can admire them while you wear them. I love the craftsmanship- the touch of the hand. There is an emotional connection to a piece that was exquisitely made. I also love that jewelry speaks to the time and place that it was made whether it be from the Victorian era or the Dynasty/Dallas 1980’s.

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I fell in love with snake jewelry because of the baby sitter that stayed with my brother and I when my parents went off on their world travels. She was an original hippie Deadhead with an old BMW 2002. She had this amazing jeweled gold Victorian snake coil bracelet that she inherited. She’d casually wear it on her upper arm with jeans and a beat up tank top. I convinced her to let me borrow it for my senior prom. I hated my dress and my date, and the hairstylist screwed up my updo but it was worth it because I got to wear the snake.

xoxoGemGossip

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You can follow Jemima –> @HomeoftheLand

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My Jewel Box: What I Bought In Tucson & Miami 2017

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Hey guys & gals.

hahaha

I’ve never started a blog post like that before. Should I just leave it? Ok, I will.

Here is the long overdue blog post about the items I brought back from my trips to Tucson & Miami. Anytime I go to a jewelry show, I never know what I’m going to find so the energy is always slightly tense and adrenaline is constantly flowing. If I buy something at a show, I never know for certain if I’m going to keep it or sell it–I’ve realized I have to bring it home and introduce it into my collection, wear it a few times, and decide if it feels like it should be mine forever or not. I can’t tell you how I determine that, I just know.

This time around in Tucson, I never knew I would find a piece of jewelry I would love and end up keeping. I was totally focused on buying gems, crystals and random minerals (see second photo) but when I stopped by the Excalibur Estate Jewelry booth at AGTA in Tucson, the ring kind of found me. It didn’t help that I had been searching for a special client of mine for something just like this, but it was out of her budget. I bought it anyway. The whole rest of the trip, I treated it as though it was for my client and that I would be saying goodbye to it as soon as I got home. Every time I thought about selling it, I couldn’t! I also kept looking at pictures of it (actually the exact photo in this blog post) the whole plane ride home. I had to keep it.

My next trip to Miami was only a week later, so normally I would be like “my budget is DONE” after buying something like that in Tucson. I had some good timing with my EBTH sale being launched the same day Miami started. I took my entire inventory and put it up for auction with EBTH–sort of nail-biting as every piece is sold at no reserve–so yes several pieces went for hundreds less than retail value, but I was able to justify finding and buying three amazing new pieces for my personal collection.

The three rings in the last photo above on the left are my Miami Antique Show finds. The furthest one on the left is from Shelly Storch Fine Jewelry–I found it early on in the day on my last day, I made an offer which wasn’t accepted and then came back right before I left at the end of the day. This is one of those rings that you simply can’t stop staring at! The turquoise and black enamel ring was found at Haig’s of Rochester and I love the contrast of the turquoise with the enamel. I think it may have been a stick pin conversion–while most stick pins are tiny, this one is pretty large, which is what I like about it as well. The last purchase from the Miami Antique Show is the Art Nouveau diamond and black enamel ring from Marlene Wong Alvarado Antique & Estate Jewelry. She is a seller who has been in the business for YEARS and is based out of Corpus Christi, Texas. She told me she personally wore that ring for over 20 years, as it was in her personal collection and this was the first time she was offering it for sale. I told her I would take good care of it! It is marked Syman and I couldn’t find much about this maker online. I posted a photo of the ring on a Facebook Group I’m a member of–Antique Jewelry Identification Group–and my friend Jenn believes that it is a Colorado based company from the early 1900s. If you know more about this maker, please contact me!

xoxoGemGossip

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Jewelry Collection Stories: Malena of Malena’s Boutique

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My Jewel Box: Five Ring Additions to Round Out 2016

My Jewel Box | Gem Gossip

I was giving myself a good chuckle yesterday because I’ve gotten a few comments from people asking why I stopped my YouTube videos–especially my main series Gem Gossip Read & Wear. The point of the series was to try to keep in tact a New Year’s Resolution I made last year–which was to only buy one ring per month, and also read one jewelry book per month. As with most resolutions, I started out strong–almost too strong. I knew my demise was near. Sure enough, I couldn’t keep up and bought way too many rings. Also my sister who edits and creates all the video content was having health difficulties, so that contributed to my sudden drop off from YouTube as well. Hopefully I’ll be back with something new and exciting, so stay tuned.

As the year came to a close (nearly 20 days ago, are you kidding me?!) I kind of went over board with the additions to my collection. So much so that I haven’t been keeping up with the My Jewel Box posts–so I’m compiling a bunch of my acquisitions into this one post! Five rings, to be exact–all acquired in November/December. Wanted to share the stories behind and details for those interested–BECAUSE I LOVE READING STUFF LIKE THAT. Hope you do too! 😉

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This beauty was my Christmas gift from my husband this year–yes, another antique elongated diamond ring. “Don’t you have enough of those kinds of rings?!” Umm, no. I seriously cannot get enough of this style–something about it. This particular ring was found at auction from Hampton Estate Auction. It’s platinum and set with Old European cut diamonds, a 1920s piece through and through. Most of my other elongated rings are from earlier than that–so this was fun to add to the collection.

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Why Slowly Opening Jewelry Boxes is Instagram’s Latest Rage

Late Victorian Half-Hoop ring in yellow gold featuring 4 of the chunkiest & juicy Old Mine Cut Diamonds weighing 2.58 Cts. in total. • ?For any inquiries please DM or email [email protected] . . . #plattboutiquejewelry #showmeyourrings #victorian #victorianjewelry #victorianring #antiquering #vintage #vintagejewelry #vintagering #engagementring #oldminecut #oldcut #diamond #bridetobe #love #LA #vintageboutique

A post shared by Larry Platt (@plattboutiquejewelry) on Aug 25, 2017 at 10:26pm PDT

There’s always trends on Instagram. Remember when all those filters were completely necessary to add to your blurry iPhone 3 photo before posting? Then the thick, heavy white borders were very popular a few years ago. Now with Instagram Stories, I feel people are posting less on their feed (at least less unnecessary photos) and opting for a quick shot or video posted in their Story. A consistent “aesthetic” has taken over as the it-word of the time, making each post highly thought out and carefully curated. Some people love this, some people hate it. But whatever your feelings are toward this highly obsessed about app, one thing is for sure: it just keeps getting popular.

In our jewelry community on Instagram, there’s one obvious kind of post that has been sweeping everyone off their feet and giving mini heart attacks to jewelry lovers nationwide. I’m talking about the videos where someone opens up a jewelry box ever so suspensefully and ever so slowly, for a BIG REVEAL. I really don’t know who or what started this; it is hard to trace back to a particular person. I feel like Larry of Platt Boutique Jewelry has definitely been doing it the longest and has made an impact because he quite often uses this tactic in his daily postings! Larry says, “When I meet people who follow me, they say they always look forward to seeing a box video because they know it’s going to be something special.” He also states that his clients love how natural the videos feel–the item in the jewelry box is glittering away in the sunshine, untouched by photo editing and as real as it gets!

The video below is one of Larry’s all-time record holding posts, clocking in at over 98k views! This proves my inclination of how easily these types of posts can quickly become viral, which this post did just that!

Edwardian era 5-Stone Old Mine Cut Diamond #ring is boxed up and ready to go to NYC with me where it will be hand delivered to its new owner. . If you’d like to see more antique & vintage rings then come say hello to me + @thekitvintage this Saturday & Sunday @acurrentaffair vintage show in Brooklyns @industrycity . . #plattboutiquejewelry #showmeyourrings #sold #specialdelivery #nyc #brooklyn #vintage . . @nattyplatt @blanconewyork @laurelstearns @arrowandanchorantiques @circa1700

A post shared by Larry Platt (@plattboutiquejewelry) on Oct 5, 2016 at 9:35pm PDT

Others have joined in on this trend, creating some gorgeous videos of jewels being revealed by opening a box. If I had to guess why this trend is so popular, I would say that it easily resonates with people because it is almost as if they are opening the box themselves, envisioning this as a beautiful gift they are receiving. The suspense factor also plays an important part in why this is trending on Instagram.

Another antique jewelry dealer that has taken part in posting “unboxing” videos is Ismael Khan of Ishy Antiques. He is based in London and finds that these types of videos perform well for his Instagram too. Ishy says, “I’ve done five box opening videos and all five are in my overall top twenty ‘posts’ based on impressions, insights and likes for the past year. My 2 most liked posts are box openings.” If that is not clear evidence to how impactful these kinds of posts are, I don’t know what is! He also adds, “From a social media growth point of view, I believe these types of posts are popular because people have to wait to see what’s inside the box which registers views and impressions, and therefore increases engagement.”

Standing in the yogurt aisle at the supermarket filming jewellery ? This 18ct gold Art Deco onyx and diamond ring is new in today. Wouldn't it make an amazing engagement ring? UK K (US 5 1/8) and sizeable. Please DM for more information #IshyAntiques

A post shared by Ismael K (@ishyantiques) on

So the next time you’re stumped over what to post on Instagram, try your hand at the big box reveal! I’d like to recommend practicing opening the box a few times while filming FIRST before you film and post immediately. I’ve seen a few FAILS that were posted on Instagram and not done in the best way. I won’t give any examples because that would be quite rude, but I’m sure we’ve all seen them! You can even ask a friend to film while you use both hands to open the box OR get a tripod for steady filming. Not everyone has coordination and that’s ok! There’s ways of going about to help with that!

That’s what I did with the video below–I set up my camera on a tripod so I could use both hands. That seemed to work better for me at least. Another necessary part to this is getting some interesting antique boxes! I’ve seen these become quite scarce lately, but there’s always some on Instagram and eBay, although some are priced high because the seller knows how rare they’ve become! I found the hot pink one in my video below at a random antique shop in Kentucky. Talk about getting lucky in Kentucky! Always have your eyes peeled!

If you want to look down at the prettiest ring you’ve ever seen sitting on your finger, say no more. This babe is available — priced at $3200 ♥️??? Details over at @shopgemgossip

A post shared by GEM GOSSIP™ (@gemgossip) on Sep 20, 2017 at 3:28pm PDT

Have you seen this BOX REVEAL trend on your feed? Let us know a seller who does this that you enjoy watching in the comments section, I’d love to see!

xoxoGemGossip

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Newest Finds from Your Jewelry Finder, June 2017 Edition

Jewelry Finds | Gem Gossip

This time of year always seems to provoke a sense of “out with the old, and in with the new!” And by that I don’t mean throw out your antique jewelry and swap it for modern pieces–I mean to take into consideration some of my Spring Cleaning your Jewelry Box suggestions and buy some pieces that really count! Rings that make your jaw drop, necklaces and pendants that make your heart flutter, bracelets that make you feel warm inside and earrings that you know will look amazing on you–that’s what we all need! It seems that Ashley of Jewelry Finds® is not short on remarkable pieces of jewelry. She makes it her mission to bring her customers new acquisitions and is dedicated to working long days and nights to get them up on her website for you! That’s why we’ve teamed up to bring you a monthly digest of all her latest finds, to keep you in the loop and up-to-date. We don’t want you to miss a “piece of a lifetime” or something that you “should’ve, would’ve, could’ve” because as jewelry collectors, we know that happens far too often! So whether you check GemGossip.com religiously or have signed up for our newsletter, be on the lookout for our monthly “new arrivals” post from Jewelry Finds! ® — Something Old. Something New. Something You™

Jewelry Finds | Gem Gossip Jewelry Finds | Gem Gossip

Left photo:

18k rose yellow gold Victorian 1890’s Blue Sapphire & Old Mine Cut Diamond Bypass Ring, Price: $2,999

14k yellow gold Victorian Sapphire Circa 1880’s Natural Violet Blue Cushion Sapphire Old European Cut Diamond Halo Ring, Price: $3,999

Platinum Antique Sapphire Diamond Circa 1915 Filigree Old European Cut Halo Ring, Price: $7,999

Platinum Art Deco Circa 1930’s Vintage 1.72ct t.w. Old Mine Cut Diamond Engagement Ring, Price: $6,500

Platinum Art Deco 1.63ct t.w. Circa 1930’s Vintage Old European Cut Diamond Engagement Ring, Price: $7,450

14k yellow gold Vintage Yellow Sapphire Circa 1940’s Retro Natural Yellow Sapphire & Diamond Ring, Price: $7,500

Emerald and diamond dinner ring, reserved please inquire, [email protected]

Platinum Art Deco Emerald Engagement Circa 1930’s Vintage 2.53ct t.w. Old Diamond Halo Ring, Price: $4,400

18k yellow gold Vintage Estate 1950’s Cornflower Blue Sapphire Asscher Diamond Halo Ring, Price: $5,999

Right photo:

top bracelet is reserved please inquire, [email protected]

14k yellow gold Art Deco Bracelet Peridot Lattice Bangle Filigree Circa 1930’s Hinged Bangle, Price: $1,450

18k & 14k yellow gold Antique Art Nouveau 2.71ct t.w. Sapphire Rose Cut Diamond Hinged Bangle, Price: $4,999

Platinum Art Deco Diamond Bracelet Circa 1930’s Old Antique Cut Diamond Filigree Geometrical Tennis Bracelet, Price: $8,999

Platinum, 14k yellow gold Antique Edwardian 1920’s Old European Cut Rose Cut Diamond Filigree Heavy Bracelet, Price: $4,499

Jewelry Finds | Gem Gossip Jewelry Finds | Gem Gossip

Left photo:

Platinum & 18k Large Antique 1900’s 2.95ct t.w. Antique Cut Diamond Bow Necklace, Price: $6,250

14k white gold Vintage 1940’s 12.80ct t.w. Early Retro Persian Turquoise & Transitional Round Brilliant Cut Diamond Pendant Necklace, Price: $5,999

14k & silver Antique Victorian 1880’s Old Mine Cut Diamond Pendant, Price: $4,200

Platinum & 14k white gold Estate Large 5.60ct t.w. Solid Black Opal & Diamonds By The Yard Necklace, Price: $4,999

Emerald cut diamond necklace, reserved please inquire, [email protected]

14k white gold Vintage Art Deco Circa 1930’s Filigree Carved Crystal Old European Cut Diamond Pendant, Price: $799

18k white gold Vintage Aquamarine Diamond Pendant Circa 1970’s Aquamarine Pear Shape Diamond Necklace, Price: $3,800

Right photo:

Platinum Edwardian 1920’s Cultured Pearl & Old European Cut Diamond Ring, Price: $1,899

Platinum, 14k gold Art Deco Double Diamond Ring Circa 1930’s 1.28ct t.w. Old European Cut Diamond Ring, Price: $5,500

Platinum Vintage 8.46ct t.w. Emerald Cut Aquamarine Ring Circa 1940’s Diamond Ring, Price: $3,999

onyx ring, reserved please inquire [email protected]

18k white gold Art Deco Vintage 1930’s Aquamarine Diamond Ring, Price: $1,199

Platinum & 18k Edwardian Diamond Navette Ring Circa 1915 Blue Lab Sapphires & Old Rose Cut Diamonds, Price: $1,995

Jewelry Finds | Gem Gossip Jewelry Finds | Gem Gossip

Left photo:

14k yellow gold Victorian Sapphire Ring Circa 1880’s Natural Violet Blue Cushion Sapphire Old European Cut Diamond Halo Ring, Price: $3,999

14k yellow gold & platinum Vintage 5.60ct t.w. Emerald Cut Amethyst Circa 1940’s Jones & Woodland Ring, Price: $1,599

14k yellow gold Victorian Enormous 7.03ct 12mm Cabochon Moonstone Ring, Price: $2,999

18k yellow gold Unique Rose Cut Ring Pave’ Diamond Serpent Wrap Cocktail Unique Statement Ring, Price: $5,999

18k yellow gold Vintage Art Deco 1930’s Old European Cut Diamond Milgrain Navette Cocktail Ring, Price: $3,999

14k yellow gold, silver Antique Art Nouveau Peridot Old Mine Cut Diamond Ring Circa 1900’s Floral Statement Ring, Price: $4,400

Opal ring reserved please inquire, [email protected]

Right photo:

Platinum Art Deco Old European Cut Diamond Sapphire Chandelier Earrings, Price: $15,000

Vintage Diamond Art Deco Earrings Circa 1930’s Filigree Old European Cut Single Cut Diamond Chandelier, Price: $4,500

18k yellow gold Estate Large Clover Shaped Multi Colored Cabochon Pink & Green Tourmaline Diamond Chandelier Earrings, Price: $3,500

Platinum, 18k gold Vintage 4.15ct t.w. Art Deco Emerald Diamond Earrings Circa 1930’s Chandelier Earrings, Price: $9,950

Jewelry Finds | Gem Gossip Jewelry Finds | Gem Gossip

Left photo:

first two necklaces reserved, please inquire [email protected]

18k yellow gold Vintage H.Stern Estate 1980’s Aquamarine Diamond Pendant, Price: $4,200

Art Nouveau 1900’s Antique Old Rose Mine Cut Diamond 18k Yellow Gold Platinum Locket, Price: $2,000

Platinum & 14k Edwardian Vintage .75ct t.w. Circa 1920’s Old European Cut & Rose Cut Diamond Star Motif Pendant, Price: $2,999

Right photo:

Art Deco Wedding Band Platinum Three Stone Baguette Diamond 1930’s Stacking Ring, Price: $995

Platinum Vintage Diamond Wedding 1940’s Seven 7 Stone Diamond Wedding Band, Price: $699

18k white gold Art Deco 1930’s 0.20ct t.w. Ten Diamond Vintage Wedding Band, Price: $599

Platinum Art Deco Circa 1930’s 1.16ct t.w. Old European Cut Diamond Filigree Ring, Price: $3,499

Platinum Antique Diamond Filigree Engraved Wedding Band Circa 1920’s 8 Stone Single Cut Bead Set, Price: $1,350

18k yellow gold Antique Circa 1890’s Victorian 5 Stone Opal Old Mine Cut Diamond Ring, Price: $1,850

18k yellow gold Art Deco Five Stone Wedding Band Circa 1930’s, Price: $2,600

>> Need to see any of these pieces in a video? Check out Jewelry Finds Youtube channel for 360 views!


This sponsored post was brought to you in collaboration with Jewelry Finds. ®

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The Gentleman’s Guide to Buying Vintage Engagement Rings

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So you know that she wants a vintage engagement ring, but what now? This handy and comprehensive guide, written by the experts at Estate Diamond Jewelry will hopefully shed some light on a journey fraught with potential pitfalls for the uninformed, and make the whole process much easier than it otherwise might be.

A Quick Rundown on the Vintage Eras

We believe that understanding the vintage jewelry eras is very important. These terms are repeated endlessly throughout the vintage jewelry scene, and recognizing the vintage jewelry eras is the first step to beginning to understand vintage jewelry.

The Victorian Era spanned from 1836 – 1901

Victorian-Rings

The Edwardian Era spanned from 1901 – 1915

Edwardian-Rings

The Art Deco Era spanned from 1920 – 1939

Art-Deco-Rings

The Retro Era spanned from 1935 – 1950

Retro-Rings

The earliest era is the Georgian Era, spanning from 1714 – 1835, unfortunately, there aren’t many genuine Georgian Rings available on the market anymore. Most of the genuine Georgian rings are not in a stable enough condition to wear on a daily basis. The Art Nouveau Era, spanned from 1895 – 1910, and partially overlapped the Victorian and Edwardian Era. The Art Nouveau designs and motifs however, didn’t really lend themselves to be easily adapted to the traditional vintage engagement ring. The rings shown above can be found here.

The Four C’s and Diamond Quality

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The Four ‘C’s of diamond classification are Carat (size), Clarity (flawlessness), Color (how “white” it is) and Cut (the quality of the cut and how the finished stone appears). A reputable dealer will happily go over each of these with you for any stone that catches your eye. Even if you have a modest budget, it is important that you feel comfortable and have a good understanding of the stone that you are interested in.

Also, bear in mind that compromising in one area will get you a strength in another. If size is important to you, you may have to compromise on clarity or color to find a diamond within your budget.

The Classes of Diamonds

Carat – The larger the number the heavier the diamond weighs. One carat weighs 200 mg.

Color – The whiteness of the diamond. The whitest diamonds are ranked as a D. The diamonds get more yellow as the letters move closer to Z.

Clarity – The clarity of a diamond ranges from F (no inclusions), IF, VVS1, VVS2, VS1, VS2, SI1, SI2, I1, I2, and I3 (included).

Cut – The cut measures the perfection of the facets of the diamond. There are four standard rankings: excellent, very good, good, and fair. (Please note that antique diamonds tend to rank lower on this scale because they were cut by hand.)

For a comprehensive walk-through on everything that you need to know about diamonds, click here.

Determining Antique Diamonds

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Determining the age of a diamond accurately is very hard, even for experts, but we can give you a few tips to help you at least determine if the diamond is old.

  • The culet. If you look down the center of the diamond and see a culet (a rounded facet at the bottom) there likelyhood of the diamond being old is extremely high.
  • The table. The table is the flat surface at the top of the diamond. Current GIA standards favor a larger table surface. Older diamonds will usually have much smaller tables.
  • The girdle. A frosted girdle is good indicator that the diamond is old.

For more information on dating antique diamonds and why antique diamonds are treasured, click here.

The Style and Design

Most people have heard the term “solitaire ring” without ever really fully understanding what it means. A solitaire ring is simply a ring with a single stone, usually but not exclusively a diamond, and has become an iconic representation of an engagement ring. But solitaires, as popular as they have become in recent years are just one in an almost endless array of designs for engagement rings.

There are several popular periods for antique engagement rings, many of which have gone on to influence modern day designs significantly. One of the most important periods for design generally, and which had a terrific impact on ring design was the Art Deco period of the early 20th Century. Art Deco is demonstrated by symmetrical, even at times quite aggressive designs that lend themselves perfectly to drawing the eye to the diamond of the engagement ring.

11494-Art-Deco-Antique-Engagement-Ring-Artistic

Considered a little more “edgy” that earlier style periods, both in construction and intent, the symmetry of engagement rings from this period manages to stay clear of straying into what might otherwise have been early “bling” by the considered cut and placement of the stones. It isn’t unusual to see a center diamond surrounded by a pavement of small sapphires or rubies, or even other diamonds. This can allow the center diamond to be a little smaller and, therefore, a little less expensive whilst appearing bigger than it really is.

The fact is, though, that style is a very personal thing. Find something you like, and then ask yourself will your future fiancé like it. Actually looking at her current ring collection before you start shopping, or the ones she wears at least, will give you some idea of what to look for. If she has rings she wears all the time, don’t be afraid to look for an engagement ring that might compliment them, whether by color or design.

Platinum is the metal of choice for the band of the ring, due to it being hypoallergenic, but the choices extend to gold in many colors, giving a wide range of choices. Antique rings from the Victorian Era will very likely have silver in them as well.

To understand a little bit more about vintage motifs and styles, click here.

The Budget

Only you can decide how much your budget should be. Of all the questions that you and your fiancée will be asked about the ring, “How much was it” won’t – or at least shouldn’t – be one of them. As long as you stay within your budget, don’t be drawn into overpaying for a ring just so that you can brag about the cost.

11242-Vintage-Old-Euro-Ring-Artistic

If your fiancée is really the one for you, you could put an old beer can ring pull on her finger and it wouldn’t matter. (Don’t do that, by the way, the tactic only works in movies.) Leave the cost boasts to the celebrities.

De Beers, the diamond mining and dealing giant first coined the phrase “A month’s salary that lasts a lifetime” to boost sales within a falling diamond market during the lean years of the 1930s. They upgraded it to “Two month’s salary…” by the 1980s, so it seems their campaign paid off.

So is two month’s salary a fair price? It all depends.

Will it be a single solitaire diamond, or one with more stones in the setting? Will it have different stones such as sapphires or rubies as well as the diamonds. How big will the stones be? What will the quality of the stones and the setting be?

Any one of them can make a huge difference to the cost of the ring. The key is NOT to see the vintage ring as an investment, although it will more than likely rise in value, but to see it as part of your life story. A permanent, irrefutable element in a story that now involves two people.

Set your budget and have a cast iron determination to stay within it. Or at least within 20% of the top end if you see something you really like. Whether this is two month’s salary or just enough so you can eat this week makes no difference. The main thing is to find a ring that you’ll both love. An engagement ring isn’t just a piece of jewelry, it is the guardian of a treasured moment that you will share forever.

Quality and Assurances

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This is where finding a reputable dealer with a sound background and credentials becomes crucial.

Most vintage engagement rings will have one primary (and possibly many accenting) diamonds within the setting. As mentioned above, diamonds come in a wide range of qualities and, by extension, values. The best diamonds sell for very high prices and have lots of nuances, but that doesn’t mean lower valued stones should be overlooked.

To all but the practised eye of an expert, many of the internal flaws and color tints that lower some value from the stone will be all but undetectable to an untrained eye, even yours. A trained and honest salesperson should be able to navigate you along the path, educating you along the way, and helping you make this important decision.

Certifications and Insurance

If you have a budget that allows you to consider a diamond in excess of 1 carat, you should get a certification or appraisal into the grading of the stone. These are independently produced and certify the quality of the diamond should you need it at any point for insurance or other purposes.

Speaking of insurance, make sure you get the right level of cover for the ring you buy. There are specialist jewelry insurers as well as cover being usually available from your home and contents insurer. Have the ring re-valued every couple of years and make sure you upgrade the cover if needed. Not that the emotional value of an engagement ring can ever be measured, but loss and damage does happen and a “free” replacement is better than paying twice.

For more information on how to insure your jewelry, click here.

A Final Thought

The value of an engagement ring can’t just be measured in dollars, it’s far too important to simply be a financial thing. What it signifies is a partnership that is taking a significant step forward and which will define you both for decades to come. Above all else, buy an engagement ring that shows the purchase wasn’t just about you. We all like, and need, to feel appreciated so keep that in mind when you make the single biggest “I appreciate you” statement of your life.

This post was written and brought to you by Estate Diamond Jewelry.

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The Ten Best Vintage Engagement Rings from Trumpet & Horn

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Moonstone Monday: Take the Moonstone Challenge!

Moonstone Monday | Gem Gossip

I own three rings that feature moonstone: clover ring from Fancy Flea Antiques, cluster ring set with one large moonstone surrounded by Montana Sapphires from Lang Antiques, & cluster ring set with a center garnet from Diamond Addiction

Moonstone ring

One of my favorite moonstone finds on Etsy: Athena cameo from Otherwise Engaged

Moonstone ring Moonstone Ring

Absolutely obsessed with this ring from Victoria Sterling on Ruby Lane & this moonstone cluster from Ellen Ring

I’m usually really good about keeping my jewelry clean and organized, neatly putting away what I’ve worn each day back in its place before bedtime. That has NOT been the case these past few weeks! My piles of worn jewels began to stack up–one on the dresser and the other on my nightstand. It got out of hand when I opened up my jewelry box and it looked bare! So I turned on some good music and started to put each item back, one by one. This led to some reorganizing and of course, purging (hence why I added some pieces to @shopGEMGOSSIP).

Whenever I reorganize my jewelry box, I sharpen my aesthetic and narrow my taste. I also notice things I don’t normally notice if I were to keep everything in the same place every time. This particular time I noticed my moonstones glistening in the sunlight. I only own three rings that feature moonstone, but they are surely my favorites! I decided to gather all three for a photo (above) and enjoy the enchanting gemstone for what it is all at once.

I’m asking you to do the same: gather all your moonstone rings and jewels you own and snap a photo. Post it on Instagram and tag #MoonstoneMonday and tag @gemgossip in the photo! I’ll post some of my favorites! I also picked some of my favorite moonstone pieces that are currently online for sale! See above! Happy Monday!!

xoxoGemGossip

WANT MORE? Learn about Sapphire, Emerald & Ruby here!

Thanks to Gossip Gem

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YES! I CAN buy that! — Jewelry Under $500

Jewelry Under $500 | Gem Gossip

I asked for feedback…you gave it…and I listened! Someone requested I feature more budget-friendly jewelry, so I put together a list of 20 items all under $500 that I would want to have in my own jewelry box! I made sure to gather a good mix of both modern and vintage/antique–so some of the pieces are one-of-a-kind and once sold, they are gone! Going on a virtual shopping spree is my favorite thing to do (well, besides the real thing) so I hope you enjoy this post just as much as I have putting it together! So without further ado, here are the goods!

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