Yellow and White Haldi Flower Jewelry

Here is a flower jewelry set that I made after a long time. Its quite a departure from my usual sets as its soft, sweet and elegant with pastel yellows and offwhite.In a culturally vibrant and diverse country as India, color and its multitude of expressions is what holds together the contrasting outlooks, lifestyles, and traditions.

Here is a flower jewelry set that I made after a long time. Its quite a departure from my usual sets as its soft, sweet and elegant with pastel yellows and offwhite.
In a culturally vibrant and diverse country as India, color and its multitude of expressions is what holds together the contrasting outlooks, lifestyles, and traditions. Color and its symbolism stands out and controls every aspect of life in India, be it religion (Saffron, white, green), politics (red, black, saffron), or festivals (multi colors). Color is entwined with Culture here and is an integral part of the rituals and traditions.
Colors like red, maroon, bright or golden yellow and green are used the most during celebrations – festivals and weddings alike. Bright, deep or dark colors are usually preferred and the only exception to that is the use of light yellow. Bright yellow is related to the intellect and is supposed to help keep you calm and cool during stressful yet auspicious occasions like weddings. It is also denotes purity, fertility and prosperity.

haldi yellow flower jewelry


Light or pale yellow considered pale or sickly by western standards is considered to be the color of sanctity, optimism and cheer here. As white is considered inauspicious, during weddings white fabrics and clothes are dipped in turmeric water which results in them becoming a light yellow color and in a lot of communities (esp in south India) these dip-dyed clothes are worn as the bridal attire during weddings. As turmeric is a known antiseptic, a fabric dipped in turmeric is considered to be a symbol of a protection barrier or threshold that keeps out evil eyes and negative vibrations.

haldi yellow flower haath phool

This is very interesting because apart from the yellowed white fabrics (dyed as described above) washed clothes or fabrics are considered impure and are hence not worn by the bride or groom during the wedding. Strangely, silk is the only fabric that is considered to be pure even when its not washed. Talking about wedding traditions I wrote about the Haldi or Pithi ceremony in one of my old flower jewelry posts. In the south Turmeric paste is applied to strings tied on the hand and the Thirumangalyam to emphasise not just the moralities of chastity and purity but also celebrate the fertility of a woman

haldi yellow flower jewellery

This set in yellow and offwhite contains a simple choker, a long raanihaar, a tikka, earrings and haath phool. It would be interesting to see how this bride styles her look with my jewelry.
I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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Festive 2016 collection

Sayuri has been known for its thematic well planned seasonal collections but it always wasn’t the case.

Sayuri has been known for its thematic well planned seasonal collections but it always wasn’t the case. When I started Sayuri in 2008, I wasn’t trying to cater to a particular audience who like thematic pieces, I was attempting to strike a chord with every woman who wanted something unique and special, something that she would not find anywhere. So I made ranges of jewelry – pieces to fit every style, every color and every price point. Eight years later, life has come a full circle for me and here is a Festive collection that is literally a collection of random thoughts, concepts, and designs.
Presenting pieces from the Festive 2016 collection that are in shades or blue and pink. I’ll post the remaining designs in a following post.

Festive 2016 collection

Unique, handmade colorful beaded necklaces with a variety of interesting mixed media pendants.

Vibrant Lotus Necklace – A long statement necklace with a Lotus paper and resin pendant and multicolored beads
Luminescent sea – Inspired by the frothy sea waters and floating algae the beaded necklace of glass and howlite beads come with a shimmery mixed media pendant.

Beach sparkle necklace – Silk cord necklace with glass beads and a silver foil – paper pendant set in resin
At Indian beaches you can see a rare sight – of women dressed up in silks, flowers and in their finest jewels (particularly during festivals) as opposed to being in quick drying beachwear as in other countries. My necklace though made in traditional blues and greens of the beach theme have elements like silk cord, rhinestones and metal foil to as an ode to this interesting fashion adaptation that is based on a social agenda of looking your best when you go out with your family.

Colors pops – Looped beaded necklace in bright colors with brass links. Picture a Saturday evening at the beach during sunset – its cool, a bit crowded and completely colorful with an energetic vibe. Colorful umbrellas, balloons, cotton candy stalls, and kites dot the beach completely replacing the brown and blue color spectrum with lots of vibrant colors.

Reflections Dew Drop: Icy blue crystal necklace with a Silver foil pendant that has a matt blue patina on it. For added interest I have used silver foil glass beads and silver crystals along with purple glass beads and a double sided purple and green matt crystal bead. The necklace has a lot of intrinsic shine but without that blingly over the top rhinestone type of shine.

So how do you like these pieces? yes, some of them were made for various challenges (ABS, BNB – “The day at the beach”, etc,.) and with certain tweaks, I thought that they would all fit in.
They are all available for sale, please email me to buy

I hope you find it interesting
Cheers

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Metal Cloud Earrings

I have a confession to make – “I am crazy about clouds and I love taking pictures of the sky!” If I could photograph anything I wanted to, I would probably photograph clouds.

I have a confession to make – “I am crazy about clouds and I love taking pictures of the sky!” If I could photograph anything I wanted to, I would probably photograph clouds. For me there is no “ordinary” cloud – every cloud is special and beautiful in its own way. I have pissed off many with this compulsion of mine, to stop, admire, and photograph clouds even when I am in the middle of something important. From dates to functions, from roadtrips to photoshoots – none have been spared. So to hear Keith Christiansen, a curator at the MET museum speak about his attachment for clouds was very satisfying.

Photographs taken at New York City, Udaipur and Chennai

At one point he explains why he takes pictures of clouds and the sky – “it is not a record of a place that I have been too but rather an emotion that I felt standing there and looking at it.” I do not think that I can summarise my feelings for the sky and clouds any better than how Keith feels.
Many, Many artists have taken inspiration from clouds, from Sunrise and sunset skies to fuel their imagination. Next only to flowers, I consider the ever changing nature of clouds as the universal definition of strong inspirational direction.
This Month’s we’re all ears challenge is all about Weather – wind patterns, clouds and rain and as inspiration Erin had provided us with Van Gogh’s Wheat Field with Cypresses that I had posted in the September ABS challenge here

I had great plans for all sorts of earrings when I started writing this post a week back and was then struck down by 102 deg fever. But I have made 2 pairs at the last moment. One is a direct realisation of cloud earring showcasing deep dark booming clouds and the other is a more stylised version of cloud movement in the evening just before the golden hour. The long stud meant to be worn as evening or party wear. Both are studs and are made of brass – brass flower stamping blanks (cut into the cloud shape) and brass wire. I have used my new texture hammer from Parawire to add interest to both pieces. I somehow like the texture on the wire better, what do you guys think?

We’re all ears – its cloudy

I have blinged up both earrings with swarovski crystals and lots of pearls. I also like how the loreals in the first earrings move a lot without making much sound, an attribute I prefer in my earrings. On hindsight, I think I should have not wrapped such heavy pearls to the earrings. As it quite long and tilts to the side (as per the design) it feels even more heavy. But it would be nice to wear it on an evening out and be the cynosure of all eyes. That’s it for this reveal folks and as I close I am going to leave you with more cloud pictures I took in the last few years all over the world.
Photographs taken at Chennai, Kathmandu, New Jersey, and Philadephia

I just realised that even though my inspiration pictures are colorful, vibrant with a happy vibe my designs are dull and melancholic, maybe reflecting my current state of mind and body. Maybe looking at all the beady baubles that the other participants made would cheer me up so I am off to visit the challenge reveal page. Why don’t you all join me ?

I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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Beadfest Summer 2016 part II

Whenever I show the pieces that I made at Beadfest to my relatives, they ask with wonderment – “How did you make so much in four days?” My answer was and is that after years of instructing students to concentrate in class, I took my own advice and applied it to the workshops. Still, I too was amazed to see how much one can accomplish with hard work.

Whenever I show the pieces that I made at Beadfest to my relatives, they ask with wonderment – “How did you make so much in four days?” My answer was and is that after years of instructing students to concentrate in class, I took my own advice and applied it to the workshops. Still, I too was amazed to see how much one can accomplish with hard work. But it wouldn’t have been possible if I didn’t have wonderful and generous instructors. I spoke about Jean Breaderoe and Marti Brown in the part one of the Beadfest post. In this post, I would like to share my experiences of the other two workshops that I attended with Richard Salley and Lisel Crowley.


Day 3: Stacking Stones
When I was selecting workshops to attend, I was very particularly that I learn at least 4 different skills. I chose metal as my common link and wanted to pick one metal clay, one coloring or patina, one bezel setting and an another class for some extra soldering input. I kept changing the classes to fit into the available time, skill level and their affordability. But, however, I chose I kept coming back to the stacking stones class by Richard Salley. His pieces looked so chunky and store bought (meaning so well made that it could be casted using a machine mould) I backed off thinking that I don’t have enough soldering experience to do justice to it and then he wanted us to bring tools. How was I going to carry saw blades and hammers on an international flight? Finally, I summoned up some courage and wrote to him. He was very sweet and offered to teach me if I was interested. Ofcourse, I was interested! He stayed true to his word at the workshop and taught me very patiently, calling me “Little girl” all the while 🙂
In a few hours, I learned how to size a cab, drill a hole in an agate cab (it was super hard!!), make a bezel, saw the backplate, make silver balls, rivets stones, set a stone, and solder a ring base to the bezel. I did that all at one shot for the first time. My very first bezel was a perfect fit for the stone OMG!! Though I melted one of the silver beads during the final solder and had a normal redo with the riveting (flaring) the turquoise stone setting to agate, the ring turned out to be pretty decent.

I was super thrilled that I bought more silver from him to try and set a chunky lapis lazuli cab that I had bought in Mt.Abu in 2012. Then disaster struck at every stage, I melted the bezel wire, burnt away silver beads and my base plate became shapeless. How much ever I tried I couldn’t fix it, even after Richard taught me how. By this time, even those participants who were trying complicated cutouts for their first piece had finished them and left. But Richard was extremely patient, and he fixed the bezel for me and showed me how to smooth a setting over a large stone. The “D” is slightly tilted and the texturing has flared out the metal in a couple of places but overall I am happy with it. So I patina-ed and sealed it after coming home but I am yet to string it.


Day Four – Romancing the Stone
On the final day I took up he Precious metal clay class with the PMC queen Lisel Crowley. I am not a clay person to begin with, so I took up this class to challenge myself knowing fully well that I will not be working with PMC anytime in the near future as its very expensive and I don’t have a kiln to fire my pieces in. As expected I didn’t enjoy this class much. My clay was extremely dry and it had to be reconditioned many times and I had to redo my bezel over 5 times as it kept cracking. Also the stone that I initially picked turned out to be too big for the amount of clay that we were given so I had to change my design as well. But somehow I figured things out and made one Art Nouveau style vine pendant and another mini charm using a cubic zirconia stone that I had with me and scraps of leftover clay.

I did learn a lot about what not to do with clay in this class – like, if you want a textured impression at the back plate then you must be careful during the final cleanup before firing and you must not sand after dehydrating but after firing. I also found that cold hands like mine are actually an advantage when working with PMC.


I brushed it clean, patinaed and sealed this piece after I came back but I am yet to string it or wear it. I like the fact that it is quite heavy and looks like an antique heirloom (probably worn by some medieval princess)


I cannot conclude writing about my beadfest experiences without mentioning all the wonderful people I met there. Everyone was so friendly and even extra nice when they found out that I had come all the way from India.I had a fan girl moment when I clicked a selfie with the Susan Lenart Kazmer of Ice Resin and Justin Russo of Ranger inks. I cannot forget the ever helpful and ever Ellie who manned Beadfest’s FB page and answered all my queries patiently. On the second day after the niobium I met Lori Schneider and Robin Showstack who stayed with me as roommates for the rest of the fest. It was so much fun being with them – listening to their stories, learning from their experiences and at night showing off each others haul of the day. I have never stayed with or even spent a lot of time with people (in person of course, nah, Social media doesn’t count!) who share my love for all things jewelry in a very long time. Thank you guys for making my beadfest trip very enjoyable and memorable.
If I ever get an opportunity to attend beadfest or a similar event with beads and jewelry I would definitely be there. It the meanwhile I need to work on my completely diminished physical health and slightly shaky financial health and get back to normal boring life.
I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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Beadfest Summer 2016 – a retrospection

Beadfest Fall is almost upon us (from October 13-16th 2016) at Tacoma but I realise that I am yet to write about my experiences at Beadfest Summer 2016. The last month has been pretty exacting – I have been extremely sick yet was working full time.

Beadfest Fall is almost upon us (from October 13-16th 2016) at Tacoma but I realise that I am yet to write about my experiences at Beadfest Summer 2016. The last month has been pretty exacting – I have been extremely sick yet was working full time. I was the organiser of a 2 week long event with competitions and ceremonies at work and then came the navaratri display. But slowly I am getting a handle on things so without much ado here are the highlights of my beadfest workshop experience – well in two quick successive posts. Beadfest Summer 2016 happened at Oaks, Pennsylvania, near Philadelphia. From King of Prussia (where I stayed at) I had to go through the valley Forge park to get to Audoban and Oaks. The first morning I was pretty scared, for the route looked like a hill station roa d- completely green and devoid of houses or stores for a few miles but then slowly I began to enjoy it for it is impossible to find such beautiful trails in Chennai. So coming back to the workshops – I had such fantastic learning and so many experiences in four days that I cannot do it justice by by cramming it all into one post. Hence in this post I am going to only talk about the first two workshops.

Crackle Enamel necklace by sayuri


Day 1: Celestial Fusion
I couldn’t have asked for a better class to start my beadfest experience or a better teacher than Jean Van Brederode of Charmed I’m Sure Studio. Jean was very sweet and patient and her work with both Crackle Enamel and stamped solder was fantastic and very inspiring. Including me there were only five of us in the class so we got to learn and experiment a lot. At first, we learnt was to create the back piece for prong setting – cutting the plate and wire, making the bail and soldering them together using sheet solder which was all very new for me.

Then we domed another disc and enamelled it in layers. I was working with full dedication at great speed (inspite of cutting my thumb in the first 10 minutes) until I spilled a load of enamel powder on my disc and panicked. Jean calmed me down and helped me streamline it. I did a couple of firing adding colors each time that I had a fabulous piece in the end that I set and wore it immediately. I then made another piece to practice – this time using black crackle enamel.
Crackle Enamel necklace by sayuri

Some instructors do not like to part with extra supplies but Jean encouraged us to make as many pieces as we wanted in the 7-hour class which was so refreshing. I made three extra discs and 2 sets of earring charms. I also tried counter enamelling. In the Beadfest site this class was referred to as “Kiln enamelling” which troubled me as I wanted to learn torch enamelling (something that I could do at home) but it turned out to be torch enamelling only. Jean had brought a kiln but we never used it.

black Crackle Enamel by sayuri
Using black Crackle Enamel
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Metropolitan museum of Art New York

In my last post on “One day in New York City” I wrote about my visit to the MET – the mother of all museums and a temple of art. The one on Fifth avenue that I visited, is over 2 million sqft in area and has over 5000 years of art.

In my last post on “One day in New York City” I wrote about my visit to the MET – the mother of all museums and a temple of art. The one on Fifth avenue that I visited, is over 2 million sqft in area and has over 5000 years of art. Before my visit, I had planned on seeing the Greek exhibit, Some renaissance paintings, Impressionist wing and the Manus Machina exhibit as I thought only that was possible in the four hours that I had there. But as soon as I stepped inside I became greedy, (yes, this was the FOMO that I was talking about in my previous posts) and wanted to see more. I ended up seeing both the Greek and Roman wings, the Polynesian, Americas, and a part of the Arts of Africa wing, Modern art – realism, Impressionism, a little bit of post-modern art, a portion of the Old masters section, the Manus Machina exhibit, a section of the Byzantine gallery, and the Egyptian section with the mummies and the temple. To streamline the visit, I looked only at Jewelry and accessory exhibits in the Roman, Americas, and Egyptian wing.
Here are pictures of a few favourites. You can find the pictures from the impressionist wing in my post on Expression of impressions. I apologise in advance for the dull and sometimes unsharp pictures; a lot of the exhibits had dim lighting and flash photography was not permitted.

Metropolitan museum of Art New York

Greek and Roman
These were the first two galleries that I saw and they far surpassed my expectations. Even after seeing the entire gallery I couldn’t believe the amazing craftsmanship of the jewelry that was displayed. I have studied Greek art and taught Greek ideals and costumes for a while now but truth be told I never expected them to be so well made with intricate work and luscious stones. The Intaglio rings and Signet rings of the emperors and officers in garnet and coral were fascinating.

greek jewelry

Of all the jewelry that I saw, I was most fascinated by this Greek Hair bun ornament. I have seen variations of this ( Kondai valai – Hair burn fillet) being worn in India, but I never expected to see a Greek version of it, that too it gold. The round focal is reminiscent of the traditional Indian “Naga choodamani” where a snake is the focal instead of a woman’s face. Could this have been a probable Indo-Greek Design collaboration?

greek hair ornament

Polynesia and Americas
This was the wing I didn’t even plan to see – I thin I might not find anything more than some totems or masks here. Boy, I was wrong. This was the wing that I spent the most time in and enjoyed the most. I was like watching all the ‘Treasure hunt” movies at once and being transported to an era that was mythical, rich and full of glory.

wooden mask totem
The jewelry was from various places like Panama, Costa Rica, and Columbia and warranties its own post so I’ll offer only a glimpse here. The elaborate nose rings, plain pectoral ornaments, burial masks and pendants were beyond amazing. Could the head beads have been worn by Head hunters of the period?
columbian gold jewelry
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Budget Shopping in USA

My last post on Beadfest beads was filled with photographs of colorful beads.

My last post on Beadfest beads was filled with photographs of colorful beads. This one on what I bought is a little duller – monochromatic as I mostly bought metal or metallic paints. You can buy anything and everything you want in USA but when you are on an extremely tight budget, shopping for art or jewelry supplies can be considered a frivolous pursuit. Still, I managed to shop and here is my haul – artsy/crafty and jewelry related things that I bought at Michaels and at Beadfest. Apart from these items I shopped only for food, Disney souvenirs, and yes “Foreign” Chocolates to feed 100 hungry mouths back home 😀

Michaels
Outside the US, the word ‘Michaels’ conjures strong images of a treasure filled cave like structure (from Alladin) in the minds of crafters. You imagine endless aisles of crafting supplies that are to be reverently bought and carefully used. So when you step in to the store, it is a sort of an anticlimax moment – it is after all, just a craft store, that is going to tempt you to spends three times your budget.
I loved the flowers and art materials (at the King of Prussia store) but felt that the beads were far too expensive. Most beads sold there are from India or China and even at 50% off they were atleast twice their original price. So I bought some artistic wire, wire gauge, mini canvases, Prismacolor pencils for coloring on metal, Pebeo paints (my biggest splurge there), metallic alcohol inks, some rhinestone connectors and metal texturing plates. I also found a really cute Mickey – Minnie T shirt in the kids coloring section for $3.5 that was surprisingly well made and I wore it to Disneyworld.

My friends later told me, that they never shop at Michaels without a coupon. I didn’t have one, so I checked the price of everything in Indian web stores, their availability or lack thereof and only when I found a bargain I bought it. I swear I have never made so many currency conversion calculations in a single day at the end of which I became fluent in the multiplication table of the number 69. Inspite of my crazy calculations, I still spent about $132 there, which was 2/3rds of my shopping budget for the entire US trip. I left Michaels thanking God for wonderful relatives, who believed in giving me cash gifts, that I could spend on art supplies.

Beadfest
Since I was at Beadfest the entire weekend, I was able to look through the booths more than once which translates into – going overboard my budget even though a lot of what I wanted to buy wasn’t available to. My first bead purchase were the decoupaged and resin beads. I have great plans for the Frieda beads and the banana fiber horn. I bought a Xuron cutter for 12g-18g, hard solder paste, a cup burr (which was quite difficult to find) Apart from these I spent bulk of my budget at the Metallaferous booth buying textured metal, chain, bracelet blanks and a locket and at the Parawire booth buying (yes) more wire and 5 in 1 texturing hammer which has been on my list for 3 years now.


I also bought some UV resin to try as my students keep asking me about it, some casted metal for coloring and really cool enamel headpins which was my “best buy”. The Artist was selling it for just a dollar a bunch on Sunday afternoon as end of show special. On the last day, I finally gave in and bought some beetle wings and Afghan coins. My mom has been behind my life to get myself some swarovski or cubic zirconia earrings that look like solitaires and not wanting to disappoint her I finally found some luscious earrings with Cubic Zirconia (mine look like solitaries and hers are snowflakes) for the both of us. Also, my parents were getting our apartment painted while I was away and in the middle of all that chaos my mom lost her new (aka my old phone) and was extremely upset. So I got her some swarovski pearls because I was feeling really bad for her and put away some cash for a new phone.


Amazon
My purchase list had ren wax, polishing pads and Clauss scissors in list none of which I could get at beadfest. So just before I left Philly I had this brainwave to order them on Amazon and get them delivered to my Disney Resort. Unfortunately, only the Ren wax qualified for Prime shipping and was delivered on the last night of my stay in the US. I am still looking for people who are likely to travel to India in the next couple of months and will be willing to carry the rest for me.


Freebies
What is a good haul post without some freebies thrown in? I got awesome swag from the Ice resin booth – you guys are the best !! (the full story on this later) and some really yummy beads made by Lori Schneider who along with Robin Showstack were my roommates for a couple of days. It was so much fun being with them.



Out of the three beads, the beetle is my favourite (the hieroglyphics beads is the back of the beetle) and I am so happy to have some really cool artisan beads that I can use for challenges and contests.

I realize that I have been incredibly slow in posting about my trip and even when I do, its not in the right order. But then, with one infection after the other, I am all wiped out. All my energy is spent on just preparing for class and getting there on time, that I just don’t feel like doing anything else. Finally I made some Jewelry the past weekend for the BNB “A day at the beach” Challenge Beach sparkle necklace and Color pops necklace. Do check them out and like them to vote for me


I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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How to: Write a DIY Tutorial

Let me open with the disclaimer that I am not a tutorial expert and there are people who are far more experienced than me when it comes to writing design instructions. But as someone who has been writing DIY Jewelry and craft tutorials for both web as well as print, I thought I’ll share my learning with everyone.

Let me open with the disclaimer that I am not a tutorial expert and there are people who are far more experienced than me when it comes to writing design instructions. But as someone who has been writing DIY Jewelry and craft tutorials for both web as well as print, I thought I’ll share my learning with everyone.

Contrary to what people think creating a jewelry tutorial is a hard job. It hard enough when you get paid for it but harder still when you write it for free on your blog. You need to come up with an original idea (that well, will work!), create it, document it every step of the way using photographs, edit the photographs and then write the tutorial. That is just the first part; the second part is promoting it, responding to comments, answering questions, and updating it as you go. Also ,tutorials are slightly different from “How to” posts such as this one, in the sense that there is a definite product/ process that results from following the tutorial and how to is just a series of steps leading ot varied results.

When I started writing tutorials for my blog, I thought if everyone is doing it, why can’t I, it must be easy after all. I learned the hard way, that there is a big difference between writing a tutorial and writing an excellent tutorial and I cringe when I look at my old posts. So in this post, I’ll talk about the elements that make a tutorial stand out in a great way.


1. Show Finished product images:

This might sound like a no-brainer but there are hundreds (maybe 1000s) of tutorial on the net that do not show clear pictures of end products. Some of them have such tiny pictures enclosed in all sorts of fancy frames that I cannot see the details. Personally, I cannot follow text instructions and often learn how to make a product just by looking at the final picture and the material list. I look at the step wise pictures only if the product is very complicated or if the final product image is very small.
Also post at least 2 pictures (one full image showing the back, clasp or hook) and one close up. They must be in large size – one landscape and one portrait preferably as it makes your tutorial easily shareable across social media channels. Showing how the item is being used is an added bonus, though not a must.

2. Write a Detailed material list
The craziest part about writing for magazines is that they want a super detailed material list. Interweave specifies that name, size, finish, number, measurement and supplier name must be mentioned for every single consumable that it used. Also, all tools and equipment must be listed. When you write online, it doesn’t have to be that specific but it is good to have a clear material list so people know what exactly they need to create the item. When using Affiliate links, do not flood the entire list but use them only when the item is specific or uncommon as a common courtesy.

3. Take Step by Step pictures
A Majority of the craft world seems divided on this. Many say that a great tutorial must show every step (video tutorials might work better in that case) while others say that pictures showing the important or complicated steps are sufficient. I follow my “N-4 or above” rule for tutorials. That is, if there are 10 steps, I show a minimum of 6 steps visually. They can be separate images or a collage provided the images are clear and big enough. A tutorial is no place for tiny fudgy pictures. The idea is that a person who does not understand the language (in which the tutorial is written) must be able to comprehend the making process with just a rudimentary knowledge of the field.

4. Offer material or technique alternatives

When we write for an international audience, we must keep in mind that materials that are easily available to us might not be available to them. So suggest alternatives. For e.g, if the material list says Swarovski crystals, mention that it can also be created using glass, plastic or coated Chinese crystals. If the tutorial uses artistic wire mention how it can be created using base metal or other coated/plated wire. It might seem self-explanatory to an experienced person but a beginner coming across your post will require that support and guidance.

5. Discuss design Variations

Unlike Print, when we write for the web, basic courtesy demands that we discuss variations of the suggested idea. Apart from curbing plagiarism, it will encourage people to use your tutorial as a starting point to create new ideas and products.

Though there are many more good practices, I feel that the above five are an absolute must. As a bonus for all you tutorial newbies out there, here is a sample Tutorial template that I follow for every tutorial of mine. It is not restricted to jewelry making or crafts but can be adapted to any set of design instructions. So do download and share!


How to: Write a Jewelry Tutorial
A Sample Template

1. Introduction: Background of the design, your inspiration, how you chose the materials and what is the application of the idea or design
2. Finished product image no. 1
3. Material list, Material image optional
4. Method – numbered Step by step instructions with pictures
5. Finished product image no. 2, 3…..N
6.Conclusion – Summary if required (for complicated designs), any problems that you faced in the process and how they can be resolved, tips, suggestions, and variations. Add additional images if you have them as variations.
7. Call for action

That’s it for today folks, do add your tips on how to write a great tutorial in the comments section and tell me what you think of my tutorial template. If you find the template useful, please share on Social media (twitter, Instagram or Facebook) by tagging it to @jewelsofsayuri
I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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Beadfest beads

Hello folks, thanks for all the comments on Facebook, Instagram, blog and mail asking about my well being. I am truly grateful for your love and affection

Hello folks, thanks for all the comments on Facebook, Instagram, blog and mail asking about my well being. I am truly grateful for your love and affection. As my trip was very short (11 + 1 extra day due to time difference it was very hectic. Out of the 12 days, I spent 4 days travelling, 4 days at beadfest and 4 days sightseeing, apart from being sick for 9 of them (and still am with a horrible cold that refuses to go). But I don’t want to keep you guys waiting to hear about my adventures, and so, here is a short post on the beautiful beads that I saw at Beadfest Summer 2016, held at Oaks near Philadelphia, United states of America, between the 17th-21st of August (expo from 19th to21st)

This was my first time at Beadfest and first time in USA so before my Travel I had this question on my mind – what to buy at Beadfest? Why, Beads, ofcourse, people said, as it is literally in the name BEAD FEST”. I saw beads, a great variety of them and went around photographing quite a lot as well. Beads were available in every color, shape, size and material possible. It was like an exotic treasure filled cave.
Friends, who saw my instagram posts asked me if I bought them all, Sadly my answer is no. I visually feasted on them, but I didn’t buy any as most beads were from India or China and are available here at atleast half their respective fest prices and I was on a teeny weeny budget. But they were beautiful to see, and wonderful to touch and feel. Here are some of the bead pictures


Semi Precious Beads
I think there was enough Lapis Lazuli there to buy a small house in the countryside. Wonderfully blue and beautifully streaked, lapis was available in every shape possible – coins, nuggets, teardrops, rounds, and cabochons.

 

There was no dearth of semi precious beads like carnelian and agate either. I found lots of large agate slices in pastel colors and druzy agates in candy shades. Again just with regard to price (without thinking about quality) these were higher in price compared to even American web stores like Firemountaingems, beadaholique or even Autnie’s beads (which I consider slightly pricey). But they were extremely yummy to look at.


Pearls and MOP
There were 3-4 types of pearls available – real fresh water pearls, synthetic pearls, Shell pearls, and Swarovski pearls. Most of the pearls were from China or were being sold by Chinese vendors.

The MOP connectors were fascinating and they reminded me of the printed shell buttons that I used in my Valentine showers of love button necklace tutorial here

Glass
Most glass beads were Artisan made Lampwork beads or seed beads. I know that manufactured or recycled glass beads are not easily available in America, but I was surprised to see that the Indian vendors not carry them as well. I hope they do realise the opportunity and fill in the gap soon. The following picture was taken on Friday, when the expo was relatively free, I couldn’t take any pictures on the weekend as the lampwork booths and by extension the expo was quite packed with people.

 

Resin and Acrylic
Beadfest has something for everyone in terms of beads. While I saw individual beads being sold $12-$20, I also saw bunches of $3-$5 resin and acrylic beads and loads 1 dollar crystal strands.

 
 

I saw lots of different types of beads from across the world – African discs, Tibetan turquoise, Nepal cabs, beetle wings, and Afghan Coins. I recognised a majority of those materials I have come across them in Neena Shilvocks’s Caprilicious Jewellery blogposts previously. Oh Neena! You should have been there, you could have gotten all your favourite stuff at one place 🙂

Cabochons
There were multiple vendors selling Cabochons, but this particular booth was captivating as it had a huge wall of cabs. This image only shows a portion of their display which by itself is drool worthy.


Apart from these types of beads, there are also wooden beads and disks, enamelled beads, metal beads, and Polymer clay beads. If you are in America then beadfest is one of the best places to buy beads for the variety is just fantastic. A really big crowd comes out just to shop for beads at the expo. On Sunday afternoon, I saw and heard so many Indians (Tamil, Kannada and Hindi was spoken freely) that I felt that I was in Alwarpet or RA Puram in Chennai than in Oaks, Pennsylvania. South Indians are obsessed about quality and value and the fact that they were out there, shopping in large numbers only goes to show the quality of merchandise that was being showcased and sold there.

So what did I buy if not beads? To find out the answer to that question tune in later in the week to see my USA supplies haul.
PS: I have a small Giveaway upcoming for Readers in India – Stay tuned!!
I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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How to make Jhumka earrings

I like doing simple projects on lazy Sunday afternoons that keep me occupied for an hour or two just after my lunch.

I like doing simple projects on lazy Sunday afternoons that keep me occupied for an hour or two just after my lunch. One such afternoon, I stumbled upon some white silk thread jhumka bases I had bought and wondered if I could use them for something else other than Silk Thread jhumkas. My eyes then slowly wandered to the top shelf of my craft materials cupboard where I keep all my paints and glitter and that was when I knew what I wanted to do with them – make light weight glitter jhumka earrings

DIY Glitter Jhumka Earrings Tutorial
DIY Glitter Jhumka Earrings Tutorial

Materials
– 1 pair jhumka base (acrylic hemispherical dome) – any size
– Silver spray acrylic paint
– Mod Podge sparkle (referred to as MP)
– Iced enamel – Silver Inclusion
– Iced Enamels – Relique Glitz Silver
– silver tone eye pins – 2
– silver tone ear hook – 2
– 10mm Silver crystal Rondells – 2
2 mm Silver crystal Rondells – 2
– Round Faux pearls -2
– 2mm glue on clear rhinestones

Tools – Paint brush, Nose pliers, wire cutter


Method
1. Spray paint both the top and the inside of the jhumka bases ( I have used medium size) with silver paint. If you do not have spray paint use can use acrylic paint from a bottle. Spraying is easier. Do 2 coats and let it dry between each coat and between spraying the top and the bottom. Let it rest for 5 minutes.
2. Apply a coat of modpodge to the inside of the domes to seal the paint and let it dry once again.

DIY Glitter Jhumka Earrings Tutorial
3. Apply a liberal coat of MP on the top of the base with a brush and sprinkle Iced enamel – Silver Inclusion glitter on it. You can use any Silver glitter, I used Silver inclusion as that was what I had in hand. Blow slightly on the glitter so that it sticks on to the MP and add more MP at this stage followed by a sprinkling of the Relique Glitz Silver. Let it dry.
I have used two different silver glitters here for added depth and dimension (and as I find the regular shiny glitter earrings somewhat tacky). Here the glitz silver is white and reflects a lot of light while the inclusions is a gray silver with a lot of depth. I have used MP sparkle to intensify the shine, you could use the matt version if you want less shine.Yes, the earrings do look much better in person and there are not very glittery.
4. Once they are half dry (slightly tacky to touch) add more MP and glue the rhinestones on. Let it dry completely.
DIY Glitter Jhumka Earrings Tutorial
Assembling
1. To a silver tone headpin, add a pearl bead (for weight) and put add the dome on it.
2. Add the larger crystal bead followed by the 2mm bead and using your nose pliers create a loop and Add ear hooks before you close
DIY Glitter Jhumka Earrings Tutorial

Variations:
1. Use different designs of earhooks to change the look and the length (as shown)
2. Use a different color glitter (copper or bronze would be interesting) and other coordinating beads with it
3. Instead of a Jhumka, make tassel earrings using the same idea by adding chains instead of the pearls

Now that 90’s trends like culottes, white sneakers, sailor stripes, and polyester pleated skirts are coming back with a vengeance, I am pretty sure that fine glitter earrings (Gosh I had plenty of them as a kid) are going to come back too. What do you think? Do tell me in the comments if you wear jewelry or accessories that have glitter on them and your reasons for wearing/not wearing glitter.

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