Doyle & Doyle Debuts Rare Collection of Antique Jewels

1 doyle doyle antique jewelry rings crosses

Doyle & Doyle is thrilled to debut pieces from a spectacular cache of rare antique jewels, all acquired from a single collector. Including jewelry from ancient Rome, 17th century Spain, and 19th century France, these are the best examples of their type and many are hallmarked by well known jewelers. Keep reading for a sneak peek of the historic collection before it goes on exhibition at Doyle & Doyle in September.

2 doyle doyle micromosaic bangle brooch vatican workshop 3 doyle doyle antique micromosaic bangle vatican workshop

These exquisite micromosaic pieces date to the mid-19th century and are hallmarked for the Vatican Workshop of the Papal State.The Vatican’s mosaic studio was founded in the 16th century, its skilled artisans create artworks commissioned by wealthy patrons and pieces for the Pope to give as gifts. The Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo, Saint Peter’s Square designed by Bernini, and Raphael’s “The School of Athens” are among the many masterpieces you can discover at the Vatican. Originally founded in the 16th century, the skilled artisans working in the Vatican’s mosaic studio create pieces for the Pope to give as gifts and artworks commissioned by wealthy patrons. They also oversee and maintain the ten thousand square meters of colorful mosaics that adorn Saint Peter’s Basilica. This bangle and brooch are beautifully made, featuring glass tesserae so tiny that the designs look like paintings in shades of red, blue, green, and white. Perhaps a wealthy young man purchased them during his Grand Tour through Europe, or they were gifts to an important Church official. No matter their origin, they are little works of art that display the incredible skill of the Vatican’s workshop.

4 doyle doyle antique spanish gold crucifix choker long gold chains

The collection includes other ecclesiastical jewels in addition to the Vatican micromosaics, including a variety of gem-set and enameled crosses from many different periods. This striking dimensional crucifix cross is Spanish from the 17th century, detailed with enamel and engraving that resembles wood grain. Although probably not original, we love it worn on the black ribbon choker, especially when layered with antique gold guard chains. Although these are museum quality jewels, they’re definitely wearable!

5 doyle doyle antique diamond heart spanish reliquary

There are also charming examples of sentimental and devotional jewelry. The rose cut diamond encrusted heart hangs from a sweet rose gold dove. The diamonds are foil backed and you can see hints of pink, gold, and even green reflecting through the stones. The rare late 17th century Spanish reliquary pendant is a small compartment that holds a tiny bit of a saint’s blood. It’s backed by a hand painted figure of a female saint and framed by emeralds and garnets. This type of jewel was probably a private devotional artwork. Spain being an intensely Catholic country, people believed in the power of saints to affect their daily life. In additional to more traditional liturgy, 17th century Spaniards prayed to their personal saint to intervene and make their lives better.

6 doyle doyle arts and crafts turquoise pendant art nouveau enamel winged female pendant Gaston Laffitte

The other half of this incredible collection is comprised of museum quality Arts & Crafts and Art Nouveau jewelry. The Arts & Crafts Movement was a direct response to the mechanization and poor working conditions engendered by the Industrial Revolution in the mid-19th century. Adherents looked to the Middle Ages, nature, and popular folk art for inspiration, seeking to return to an idyllic time before mass production. Shying away from precious materials, Arts & Crafts jewelers favored readily available gemstones, such as garnet, amethyst, citrine, opal, and moonstone. The delicate gold pendant is British, comprised of hand wrought wirework set with bright blue turquoise and glowing moonstone.

7 doyle doyle art nouveau plique a jour enamel necklace Gaston Laffitte silver locket Lucien Coudray

By the end of the century, Art Nouveau artists took the theme of nature to the next level. Art Nouveau jewelry often incorporated idealized female forms with swirling, whiplash hair framed by sensuous flora, like this striking silver mirror locket. Dating to 1900, this lovely piece is hallmarked for French jeweler Lucien Coudray. Coudray specialized in engraving medals and won several prizes for his artistry. Another popular form was a winged female with gossamer enamel wings studded with tiny gems or pearls. This statuesque dragonfly woman was created around 1900 and bears the hallmark of noted Art Nouveau jeweler, Gaston Laffitte. The light filters through the translucent green plique-a-jour enamel wings, creating a delicate stained glass effect.

This is just a small preview of the incredible historic collection – want to see it all? Doyle & Doyle is putting on a public exhibition in September. Email [email protected] for more information and to get on the invite list!

This post was contributed by Juliet Rotenberg of Doyle & Doyle, thank you!!

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Want more?! To check out the store tour of Doyle & Doyle, click here.

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Flower jewelry collection

Hey guys, I am running around hither and thither trying to plan for and arrange my 2 week Learn-a-cation. In the meanwhile here are some pictures of bridal flower jewelry that I made in July and August so far

Hey guys, I am running around hither and thither trying to plan for and arrange my 2 week Learn-a-cation. In the meanwhile here are some pictures of bridal flower jewelry that I made in July and August so far. Please excuse me for any delay in replying to your comments, messages or emails for the next 2 weeks. Any and all fresh orders, reorders will be taken up only in the second week of September.

Green and gold ribbon rose bridal set
Bridal set for a prewedding event made with ribbon roses in 2 shades of green and acrylic gold beads. Set includes – a short necklace, a long raanihaar, earrings, bracelets (hath phool) and a half matha patti (forehead ornament)

Green and gold ribbon rose bridal set

Red rose and pearl set
This set is slightly different take on my most requested red rose set, with curly roses instead of bud roses with pearl beads. It was made for a Godh Bharai function (a North Indian traditional baby shower which means filling up the mother’s lap with Abundance)
Set includes – a short bib necklace, a long necklace, earrings, bracelets (hath phool), armlets, anklets, a waistband and a maang tikka (forehead ornament). You can see the beautiful mother to be wearing it here.

Red rose and pearl set

 

Red rose anklets


Red rose waistband

 

Bridal Party favours
An old client wanted some fun yet traditional bridal favours made and I made 22 of these ribbon rose matha pattis for her. They have ribbon roses in two tints of yellow strung together with white pearl beads

yellow rose matha patti
bridal party favours
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Bridesmaid gifts – Flower Jewelry

Bridesmaid gifts is a relatively new concept in India . Though we do buy new clothes and very rarely jewelry trinkets for our close relatives, hardly anybody will wear it for the actual wedding as it won’t be grand enough for a wedding

Bridesmaid gifts is a relatively new concept in India . Though we do buy new clothes and very rarely jewelry trinkets for our close relatives, hardly anybody will wear it for the actual wedding as it won’t be grand enough for a wedding. But with Flower Jewelry gaining popularity, many Indian and NonresidentIndian (NRI) brides have turned to Flower jewelry as Bridesmaid gifts for their pre-wedding festivities
This US based bride wanted initially Half matha pattis as gifts for her sisters and sister-in-laws to match with their green and gold outfits for her Gaye Holud Ceremony. Slowly as we got talking, the gift grew to accommodate long necklaces and matching earrings.


The challenge here was to design pieces that were grand enough to be worn to a wedding, yet not so grand that they’ll upstage the bride. Also, there had to be a small difference between two sets of design (I presume two sets were for the bride’s own sisters and the other two for her inlaws) So, out of the four two were three strand necklaces with three big and two small flowers as the focal and the other two were two strand necklaces with two big and one small flower each as a focal. In the picture below, you can see both the two strand 3mm bead necklaces with flower focals.


The green swatch that I worked with was tricky – it was an unusual green that you usually won’t find in ribbons. So I superimposed ribbon roses of 2 shades of green to arrive at the perfect color.

As these were gifts, I went with simple yet festive packaging (check them out on my Instagram page). I used hot pink earrings cards (upcycled from unused handmade paper left behind by students) with a little gold star tape and I used pink tissue paper (used by jewelry stores to wrap silver jewelry) and printed out little green Sayuri labels. They are so pretty, aren’t they?


So what did the lovely bride get for herself as Gaye Holud Jewelry? The rich red flower set with red bud roses and gold beads. It is a set with a choker with a single rose, chest length necklace, earrings, Haathphool and matha tikka (single line matha patti) or forehead ornament.


Check out my reviews page on Facebook to see what the bride has to say.


If you have ever attended a workshop at Sayuri or bought my creations or simply are a friend who has nice things to say about me and my brand, please review Sayuri on facebook to help keep up my reputation as a 5-star brand.
So what do you think of Flower Jewelry as quirky cultural bridesmaids gifts? Even if you do not follow the customs or rituals I think that these trinkets would make fun, colorful and economical gifts for friends and family.

I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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Introducing Sayuri

I thought hard and long about how to title this post and “Introducing Sayuri” seemed to be the most intriguing of the lot.

I thought hard and long about how to title this post and “Introducing Sayuri” seemed to be the most intriguing of the lot. Most of you know what Sayuri is – A Handmade jewelry brand that focuses on creating one of a kind mixed media thematic designs. Do read my About me page to know more about me and my brand. But who is Sayuri?
Many (including friends, family, and strangers I meet) have asked who Sayuri is. Some have wondered if she has something to do with Nitta Sayuri of “Memoirs of Geisha” while many others (who don’t know me) have assumed that Sayuri is, in fact, my name. Many have also asked me why I chose a Japanese name and not an Indian one when my brand so clearly focuses on Contemporary Indian jewelry.


It has been in the back of my head, for the past many years to give form to this fictional character with metaphorical meanings of life, creativity, passion, and achievement. Though I have doodled avatars, I never really like any of them. That is until I went to Coorg.
Earlier this year near the Bylakuppe monastery (a large Tibetan settlement) near Coorg, I found a few stores selling Japanese lady paintings, patchwork, and dolls. It was the patchwork that caught my attention first, followed by the bamboo paintings as my mom used to make them when I was a kid. She would spend hours working on the patterns, fabrics, their folds and passed on her love for Japanese culture to me. This was the time when Oshin, a super popular Japanese TV series was telecasted in India and wherever I went people thought that I looked like the child actresses from Oshin. I guess that answers the “why Japanese” question as it was the first culture that I was exposed to apart from Tamil Culture.

Bylakuppe monastery

Coming back to Bylakuppe, when my mom and I looked at the Japenese geisha dolls, we turned to each other and grinned and she said “Hey look…” and I completed the sentence with “Sayuri”. We decided to buy one. There were many of them clad in bold colors and ostentatious patterns – red, black, orange, Fuschia and blue. Some played the flute, while others had fans or flowers in their hand. Some had very elaborate hairdos and decorative clothing. Normally I would have picked one of them, but I wasn’t happy and my eyes kept darting back to this simple figure wearing blue and pink and reading a note. Light blue and pink are colors I usually dislike and this figure was plain – a simple Kimono, a basic obi, and a small fan on her head. But she felt right – She felt like Sayuri and here she is.


Once I brought her home, I dressed up her a bit. I added ribbon roses and Kanzasi flowers on her her head along with a butterfly and head pins to act as hair sticks. I added a ribbon belt and a flower to her Obi and placed a fan I bought at the Sa Paper Handicrafts in Chiang Mai. I made her travel ready with a handmade match box suitcase (that I originally made for my Navratri kolu in 2015) and a guide book with a customised bird cover.

So who is Sayuri? She is a mixture of who I am, and who I want to be. She could be any and all ofyou. She is fair (in every sense of the term), well read, well travelled and very comfortable with who she is. She has eclectic tastes and her heritage is what paves way for her modern thinking. She is independent, industrious, strong and sensible. She loves standing out of the crowd, is quiet, yet shows no hesitation when it comes to making friends. And yes, she could be my ideal client (PS: you do not have to be Japanese to wear my creations, though Japanese clients are definetly welcome!!).

I wish I could be just like her and travel the world. I have been wanting to attend Beadfest for over 3 years now but the financial aspect of it is just mind boggling. I do wish that I get some sponsorship or an opportunity to partner with a tool, supplies or beads or publication business or any design service at beadfest or before that will help me pay for some of my expenses.Or maybe other participants with whom I could stay or split costs with. If you do know of any such opportunity, please inform me. And yes do tell me what you think of “My Sayuri”.

I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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Swap and hop Reveal

Vanakkam, Vandanam, Namasthe to all the folks visiting JewelsOfSayuri for the Bead peeps swap and hop reveal.

Vanakkam, Vandanam, Namasthe to all the folks visiting JewelsOfSayuri for the Bead peeps swap and hop reveal. Our Hostess Linda had put together a list of 53 magnificent jewelry blogs and bloggers early this year for a bead swap and now its time for the reveal. My Partner is Kelly Hosford Patterson of Pyxeestyx- The travelling Sideshow and to see what we sent each other, check out the swap intro post here.
The beads were all so gorgeous and the colors – green and blue, and fitting perfectly in my comfort zone. I assumed that it would be extremely simple and I would churn out pieces by the dozen.
Since most of my customers prefer pieces with an Indian traditional look, I hardly get to experiment with very modern, western arrangements. Hence, for this reveal, I decided that I would make a piece that was completely western. After some brainstorming and word association, I settled on the following words – Rustic, frosted, mouldy, dreamlike to guide my design process.

Ceramic and metal necklace by Sayuri


Of the Yore Necklace: The idea here was to use the copper domed disc, the ceramic (?) tube and the bone sort of piece as the focal component(s) by marrying them together with wire. This simple process proved to be extremely frustrating because of the sound that arises when ceramic/frosted glass/natural components/chalk strike metal. Metal on metal is even worse! (You should see me when my colleagues eat lunch with their metal spoons 🙁 ) It was this minuscule sound that drove me absolutely mad and my teeth start grinding even when I just think of it. I somehow powered through it and finished the piece but I did not even want to touch it, so I took it apart and remade it using embroidery thread.To avoid any more friction and the resultant noise I replaced the beads at the neck with a strand of leather cord and cotton cord each – in brown and blue respectively to bring out the colors of the main components.

Ceramic and metal necklace by Sayuri

The bone piece and the sea glass still feels chalky to touch and I am wondering if coating it with some sort of a sealant will help? Any Suggestions? I love how this piece looks and really want ot wear it

Neel – Gulab Earrings (Blue and pink earrings): For my second piece, I made a quick pair of wire earrings with the carved fan shaped blue sea glass beads and rose quartz beads to match a new printed pink, blue, and beige cotton shirt. I cheated a bit and wore them both to work on Tuesday 🙂 before the reveal.

sea glass earrings by Sayuri

When I saw Peeps disclosing that they had made 3 -8 pieces for the hop, I made another pair of earrings but gave them away to my cousin without photographing it, so I decided to do one more using the packaging paper.

Misty Moor – I made a recycled paper pendant with foil encasement on the sides and add patina inks for more depth. It started off as shrapnel sort of form, very modern looking. But I wasn’t really happy with it, so I added some rhinestone and ball chain to it (Okay, I gave in and Indianised it!). After these pictures were taken, I have poured resin into it. I used the green nuggets and the patterned beads from the beads that Kelly sent me and finished it with organza ribbon. It feels a little imbalanced, ( I am unable to put my finger on what is wrong!). Maybe the pendant is shimmery and the beads look a little dull? I might restring it after the hop – design/color/material suggestions are welcome.

beaded neckalce with paper pendant by Sayuri beaded neckalce with paper pendant by Sayuri

Those are the pieces that I made, I still have lots of goodies left and hopefully you would see them in future designs. So what did Kelly make with the goodies that I sent her? Visit her blog the travelling Sideshow to find out. Special thanks to Linda for hosting this hop with amazing artists. Please do take time out to visit blogs of other participants of the Bead peeps swap and hop II. Happy Hopping!

Participant List with blog links

1. Linda Anderson 28.Rosantia Petkova
2. Natalie Davidson 29. Claire Fabian
3. Marcy Lamberson 30.Inge von Roos
4.Kathy Lindemer 31.Rachel Mallis
5.Dita Basu 32.Sam Waghron
6.Andrea Glick 33.Lori Schneider
7.Kristina Peck 34.Fay Wolfenden
8.Shai Williams
9. Catherine La Vite Seed Beaders
10. Christina Hickman 35.Suse Stelljes
11. Gloria allen 36.Ginger Bishop
12. Teresa Schurter 37.Nelly May
13.Maria Rosa Sharrow 38.Rebecca White
14. Susan Kelly 39.Sheila Prosterman
15. Jenny Kyrlach 40.Catherine King
16.Michelle McCarthy 41.Pallavi Asher
17. Terry Jeanette Carter 42.Krafty Max
18.Lee Koopman 43.Renetha Stanziano
19. Laurie Vyselaar 44.Becky Pancake
20.Marianne Baxter 45.Katy Heider
21.Divya N (You are here) 46.Deborah Apodaca
22. Kelly Hosford Patterson (my partner) 47.Heather Richter
23.Johana Nunez 48. Tami Norris
24. Kari Asbury 49. Brandy Scozzari
25.Robin Reed 50. Kathleen Breeding
26.Kristina Hahn Eleniak 51.Veralynne Malone
27.Robin Lynne Showstack 52.Bobbie Rafferty
53. Lori Blanchard

I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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Bead peeps swap and hop intro

The Bead swap and hop is here once again and my partner is Kelly Hosford Patterson of Pyxeestyx- The travelling Sideshow. You might remember her as the winner of my BNB challenge on Kolam where she made an exquisite hand piece with a peacock focal.As a fellow mixed media artist specializing in artisan jewelry, I was immediately drawn to Kelly’s designs when I first spotted her work on the Bead Peeps facebook group.

The Bead swap and hop is here once again and my partner is Kelly Hosford Patterson of Pyxeestyx- The travelling Sideshow. You might remember her as the winner of my BNB challenge on Kolam where she made an exquisite hand piece with a peacock focal.
As a fellow mixed media artist specializing in artisan jewelry, I was immediately drawn to Kelly’s designs when I first spotted her work on the Bead Peeps facebook group. She creates one-of-a-kind pieces, often putting together varied supplies almost in a collage style showcasing a bohemian free-spirited vibe. She loves working with fibre, paper, beads and her go-to metal for jewelry seems to be copper. She also creates Eco-Couture – tops, skirts, collars, corsets with nuno felting and patchwork. Her one of kind designs can be browsed and bought at her Etsy store. She also does travelling shows and one can find updates and snippets about her latest adventures at her facebook page PyxeeStyx ~ Traveling Side Show. Here is a small sample of her eclectic work

 

 

 
Because she works with various materials – I didn’t know what would be challenging to her. But since the idea behind the swap is to get out of your comfort zone (and rise to the challenge) I decided to create a challenge by limiting the color palette. As I browsed through her FB and shop I found less of greens, blues and silver so I sent her 2 kits – one sky blue and silver and the second green and orange. The Blue set has glass beads, foil beads, granulated beads, frosted beads – All Indian specialities along with 2 focal – a jhumka tassel finding and a stone Kundan focal.



In our early discussion Kelly had said that she would like to experiment with sari fabrics so the Green set mostly comprised of Saree ribbons (fabrics – silk, spun silk, cotton ikat, and poly brocade) that I cut wide so that she could make multiple ribbons out of them. I sent 3 focals – one Chandran – half moon in kemp (temple jewelry) style and I made the second piece by wiring a green flower finding to a handmade copper amoeba base. I had forgotten all about the artisan component until the last moment and when I got my parcel from Capriliciousjewellery there was this hemispherical dome of polymer clay that would be perfect and I added it. The elephant clasp is green on one side and blue on the other to match with either of the sets. I had wanted to add more charms and bits and ends as a surprise but in my usual fashion had left them while packing 🙁

Kelly sent me gorgeously packed boxes of beads (seriously the paper is GORGEOUS!) last week along with goodies like bitter chocolate, mixed tape (cds) and incense sticks. It was funny that the incense sticks are made about 2 hours from where I live, so technically I should have sent them to her 😉

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Gaye Holud ribbon jewellery

There is saying in the teaching community that goes like this “The more time you give students to complete their work, the less productive they get; so might as well give them a sharp deadline” Why? because they are going to do it only at the last possible moment.

There is saying in the teaching community that goes like this “The more time you give students to complete their work, the less productive they get; so might as well give them a sharp deadline” Why? because they are going to do it only at the last possible moment. Of late, I have come to realise that this holds true for people in general and not just students. Case in point, this post which I was supposed to write a month back.
In January when I was knee deep in work, I got a message asking for an urgent set for a Gaye holud ceremony that was bright and colorful and to be shipped in less than a week’s time. I seldom take assignments with a very short lead time as managing the logistics of sourcing and shipping can be very stressful even if you can get the product done fast. But this time, I did.

Gaye Holud ribbon jewellery


The only way I could do it in the given time frame was by using premade ribbon flowers. We agreed to use colors like red, lemon yellow and green along with gold accents to match with a simple Daccai cotton saree – yellow with a green border. We brainstormed on a lot of different design ideas where the Pinterest board that I have on Bridal Flower jewellery came in quite handy. You can find the inspiration for this particular set here


Some designs take a lot of experimentation and a lot of time to figure out how exactly it can be put together and some are very simple that you can figure it out all in your head, even before you pick up a single tool or supply. This entire set belongs to the second category. As soon as I bought the materials I realized how I would put it together and once I started working it got done within 3-4 hours. I just had to make a few measurement corrections the next day and add one more piece to the set – the choker. Overall it was quite breezy to make it. But that is when the self-doubt started.

Gaye Holud gota jewellery

I was raised with the belief that if something goes off very smoothly or that it is too good to be true, it probably isn’t. So after making the first necklace, I got thinking – is it good? Is it wearable? Is it too bright? Is it too shiny? I have never seen anybody wear anything like it before (only seen ornaments created like this for deities) let alone make something like it. Panic! Panic!

Red, yellow and green is a very traditional Indian color combination, something that I have managed to stay away from, for all my teen and adult life. Personally, I am more of a deeps and darks kind of girl so I found this colour combination along with gold a little too bold. But my design training has taught how that in order to expand your repertoire of designs, you need to step out of your comfort zone. So I did what I normally do to boost up my confidence, research!
Gaye Holud ribbon jewellery

I read up on traditional Bangla ornaments – their names, forms and usage. I read up on Gaye holud practices and traditions, the colors, materials and textured they used and what they meant.I read that, traditionally, not just the bride but also her attendants (friends) and close family also wear red, green, and yellow colors as they symbolize purity, sanctity, fertility, prosperity, piety and strength. During the wedding, A bengali bride wear ornaments like Cheek – Choker, Taira/Tikli – Forehead ornament, Ratnachur – Haath phool (slave bracelet), shakha-Paul baala- coral and shell bangles, and kaan pasha – ear studs or kaan bala – earrings (bangle for the ear).

A Screenshot from the 2003 Movie Choker Bali, where Aishwariya Rai is seen dressed up as a Bengali Bride

Still I was left with a nagging doubt. I have only seen Bengali brides wear a tight forehead ornament (Taira- Tikle) and a Crown (mukut made of Sholapith) on the head and never a multi strand directional headpiece like what I made. On further research (and using a little bit of common sense) I figured out that this could have been the traditional style and the Taira could been a British influence as it is used to hold down the veil (orna) which is thin tulle, very different from the thick Odhnis that Brides of North and west India wear but similar to the veils of the 18th-19th century English women.

In between my research, I tried the pieces on to check for fit and for an impromptu selfie. Ok I did put on a little lipstick, eyeliner and draped my mother’s saree and took a few pics. I looked so different – like some yesteryear Maharani or Zamindarini that I started experimenting with the filters, wondering how I would look If I was dressed up like this 90, 60, or 40 years ago. I could imagine myself in a carved wooden haveli, all dressed up, waiting for an all important photographer to come take a portrait picture. Another five minutes of my life spent imagining myself as a princess and coming to the conclusion that the pieces indeed looked good.

Thus with all my fears put to rest, I completed the set. This set is made of gold gota and ribbon roses in red, yellow and green contains a long mala – necklace in tie up style, a beaded choker, round dangling disc earrings, armlets, head ornament and haath phool (slave bracelet and ring). The bride loved it and sent a message saying

I can’t thank you enough.. You have built a relationship now and I will suggest all my friends to get their gaye holud jewelry from you. Thank you so much.”

Well if that isnt enough, I dont know what is! Overall it was a very fulfilling process and I must really thank Sowmya for trusting me and giving me this opportunity to be a part of her wedding. It gave me a chance to get out of my comfort zone and learn something new. It enriched me as a designer and as a person so thanks to her for that.

Information sources
Wiseshe
Elegant Eves


I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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Top 5 jewelry trends of 2015 – a compilation

As the wheel of fashion rotates, it spins offs interesting components which mutate into specific directions when they adapt to changing socio-cultural-environmental scenarios. As 2015 is coming to an end (how did it go so fast?) here is a compilation of few such directions or trends, inspirations, materials and colors that were all the rage in 2015.1

As the wheel of fashion rotates, it spins offs interesting components which mutate into specific directions when they adapt to changing socio-cultural-environmental scenarios. As 2015 is coming to an end (how did it go so fast?) here is a compilation of few such directions or trends, inspirations, materials and colors that were all the rage in 2015.


1. Night Light
Forecasted trend for Spring summer 2015
Imagine standing at a busy road intersection at night, watching street lights, outdoor and indoor lighting of glass walled building filtering into the street and merging with vehicular light. After a point it all sort of fades in creating a soft buzz or hums that is constantly morphing into vivid colors and patterns before transcending into soft hues and painterly swirls. Such a visual illusion was a major direction in terms of color and pattern selection for jewellery in 2015. Dull emeralds and lavendars would pair up with striking yellows and grays producing an eclectic effect. Purples in various shades were seen as a continuation from 2014’s radiant orchid. Seed bead jewellery either bead woven or embroidered were seen dominating the wedding and evening wear market with coated or foiled crystals and rhinestones taking the center stage.

 

2. Industrial
Forecasted trend for summer 2015
Architecture and geometry were other strong influences especially in the precious metal segment. The pieces were bold, streamlined with emphasis on exacting standards of quality. With the jewellery brands boldly taking the stepping forward with 3D printing, piping lines, construction pillars and axis lines were key inspirations for statement making jewellery. Raw uncut gems fused with unconventional materials like piping or rubber tubing resulted in the category of Industrial chic jewellery.
The popularity of paper jewellery in the east led to origami being a big influence in the west. These simple paper folds were replicated in metal, resin, clay and other unconventional materials leading to jewellery and accessories that almost look like structural art installations.
Images courtesy: Rocks ‘n Beads

 

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Five Diamond Earring Styles Every Fashionista Should Have

A diamond may last forever, but a style trend may not. As the fashion world continues to spill out new forms of expression every season, trends often come and go while others seem to stick around. Does your diamond earring collection keep up? Swapping looks is most easily accomplished when a vast assortment of jewelry styles is at hand, even if there is just one pair of each. If the diamond earrings in your jewelry box lack diversity, we’ve got what it takes to give it a boost. Here we recommend five earring styles that every chic lady should have in her diamond jewelry assemblage.

The Chandelier

Make a grand entrance anywhere you go wearing the 18K White Gold Diamond Chandelier Earrings by Odelia for $22,750. Not only do chandelier earrings provide an extravagant aura, but they are also ideal for accenting a formal ball gown or a casual silk camisole and blazer. Glimmering diamonds line the 18K white gold frames as eleven more of the precious stones dangle from each.

DIAMOND EARRINGS

The Stud

Stud earrings are one of the most versatile jewelry styles that can accommodate any ensemble because they are so elegantly discreet. Opt for the Platinum Diamond Stud Earrings by Tiffany & Co. for $2,200, which feature a circle of twinkling diamonds that surround a larger one in the center, all set in platinum.

DIAMOND EARRINGS2

The Hoop

For those days when you’re feeling a glitzy vibe, a gorgeous pair of hoop earrings like the 18K White Gold & Diamond Hoop Heart Earrings by Dior for $7,350 will complete an exceptional look. The hoop earring is the perfect charm for expressing the feisty inner spirit. However, this design brings a feminine and romantic feel to the table with 18K white gold hoops that carry a group of five multi-sized diamond-paved hearts.

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The Huggie

Glamorous and eye-catching, the huggie earring is structured to look like it is embracing the earlobe and usually features a bulky design. Bring attention to your outfit with the 18K Yellow Gold and Diamond Damsel Huggie Earrings by Carrera y Carrera for $2,605, which display an intricately carved mythological goddess looking into a sphere of sparkling diamonds.

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The Extraordinary

Sometimes there will be fashion moments where you just want to stand out. When that moment arrives, turn to an extraordinary pair of earrings to make an edgy statement that shows you aren’t afraid to be daring. The Margareth 18K White Gold Diamond Earrings by Chimento for $14,675 defines this type of remarkable essence with a ribbon-like twist design that is lined with sparkling diamonds.

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Don your most dazzling appearance yet wearing the right style diamond earrings to provide that extra flair. With these must-have styles, create an ensemble that flaunts your fashionable persona while also following the current trends of the industry. Find all the diamond earrings you need to make your collection complete in our jewelry inventory specials, which features top designer brands at reduced rates.

The post Five Diamond Earring Styles Every Fashionista Should Have appeared first on The Luxury Bazaar Blog.

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Wedding favours – jhoomars

A few months back, a to-be bride wrote to me asking if I could do a flower jewelry set. During our discussion, she suddenly asked me if I could make a passa or jhoomar

A few months back, a to-be bride wrote to me asking if I could do a flower jewelry set. During our discussion, she suddenly asked me if I could make a passa or jhoomar. Having no idea what it was, I turned to google and found that a jhoomar could be
Jhoomar – A (generally) large cascading chandelier or a light fixture.
Jhoomar – A Pakistani film written and directed by Syed Noor
Jhoomar – A form of fold music and dance that is accompanied by a lot of swaying and said to originated in Balochistan
Jhoomar – A fan shaped hair/head ornament worn on the side of the head by brides or dancers; also known as a Passa

The Passa looked harmless so I said that I could make one but then she told me that she wanted – a light weight jhoomar with no stones, pearls, preferably with flowers, triangular in shape,using gota, without circular base, in colors of her choice and within her budget!! Whew! I made 2-3 samples and sent her. She really liked one but I wasnt convinced about the finish and outcome nevertheless I figured I could make one piece easily.
But then came the shocker – she wanted 50 of them to be given away as wedding favours for her sangeet function which is a pre-wedding song and dance event – kinda like a bachelorette party. I was dumbfounded. I had never made a proper jhoomar in my life before with these materials (which were not available in Chennai) but to make 50 of them in less than 15 days time within the budget was impossible. I tried saying no; neither could I do it according to my quality standards nor I could make so many pieces. But then the bride convinced me somehow to make them for her.

flower jhoomar wedding favors
The red – orange-pink palette

Let me be honest here – The bride did give me a reference pic of a really beautiful jhoomar but none of the materials to make it were readily available in Chennai and I wasnt convinced that I could make everything from scratch at her budget. So I compromised. I looked for similar materials – gold roses, colored micro roses, cord and sequin tape. But as bad luck would have it my local stores like me did not believe in mass production and so I couldnt get the materials I wanted and had used in my sample. My mom sweetly stepped in and hunted stores, throughout the city to get gold roses for me. She did find them but they were bigger and shinier than what we wanted but we had to make do with them. I wasn’t really sure if they would turn out right and informed my client giving her alternate options. But then she had her heart set on one design and asked me to do it in the best possible way.

gota jhoomar wedding favors
The blue-violet palette

Armed with my trusty glue gun, I started to work. Each jhoomar had about 7 layers – the gold roses, colored micro roses, stones on top, cord and sequin tape, the base felt. and the dangles to complete them. We had originally planned that it would be worn on the hair with just a hair pin but the bride wanted some type of hook. The necklace hooks were too big and clumsy to be used on the head and we wanted something more delicate. We looked around the house and found a packet of blouse hooks that I had bought during my college days. (Yes! we are hoarders!!) The whole process was elaborate and had to be done 50+1 times letting the pieces cool between each layer. However we didn’t like the finish. So my mom and I started sewing the tapes shut and attached them to the roses and then attached hooks to to them. Our hands were numb half way from all the needle pokes while sewing through 6 layers of the tape.

ribbon flower jhoomar wedding favors

It took my mom and me a good part of 2 weeks to finish them due to my day job. I would rush home after work, finish my prep for the next day’s class, thrown in an occasional blog post and would start working on them. After going through 2 sheets of felt, 714 roses, 5 sticks of glue and a box full of dangles, they were finally done and we were so happy. Maybe a little disappointed with the overall look but happy. They were decently finished, colorful, lightweight, done on time, and within the budget. They did turn out a little bigger than we imagined (they would have been so much prettier if they were daintier) and we would have liked an actual gota for the tapes and roses but we had never thought we would be able to actually make something like this – so ‘A’ for effort!

Though I wont be taking on a project like this any time soon, I learnt a lot about tackling the challenge of production, assembly line setups, variations, etc. I couldn’t have completed the 51 pieces (we made one for the bride too!) without my mom’s help, so a huge Thank you to her 🙂 The next time I do something like this I think that I’ll be more prepared and clear regarding expectations, outcomes and the effort required for it. Despite everything, it was a fun project and I hope that it was close to what the bride had in her mind and that her guests enjoyed wearing them.

So tell me, in the comments, about the time when you were faced with a similar challenge. How did you tackle it?

I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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