Ten Facts You Didn’t Know About Engagement Rings

DiamondEngagementRings

History of Engagement Rings

1. The first diamond engagement ring in recorded history was presented by the Emperor Maximilian I of Austria to his betrothed, Mary of Burgundy, in 1477. The ring was set with diamonds in the shape of the letter ‘M’.

2. A new trend for ‘acrostic’ engagement rings emerged during the Victorian period in Britain. These featured words spelled out by the first letters of the gemstones set in the ring. The word ‘regards’ was a favorite, spelled out using a ruby, followed by an emerald, then a garnet and so on.

3. The phrase “Diamonds are forever” has entered the vernacular and lent its name to Sean Connery’s final film as James Bond but did you know that it was originally an advertising slogan? It was coined by De Beers in 1947 to kickstart diamond sales after a lull caused by the Great Depression and World War II.

Diamond Rings

4. Natural diamonds are extremely old and take around a billion years to form in the Earth’s molten interior. Stones used in engagement rings can be anywhere from 900 million years old to an astounding 3.2 billion years old.

5. The ‘carat’ is the main measurement used to judge diamonds and refers to the weight and size of the stone. It is so called because originally carob seeds were used as counterweights for the scales used to weigh diamonds. A modern carat is a metric unit equivalent to 200 milligrams, or 7 thousandths of an ounce!

6. The color of a diamond is another of the major factors that determines how much it costs. Color is graded on a scale that judges how colorless the diamond is, with white stones being the most desirable and thus expensive.

7. Which isn’t to say that other colors of diamonds aren’t much sought after. ‘Fancy diamond’ is the term used to describe a stone when its color falls outside the normal color range. Fancy diamonds can be blue, green, red, yellow, pink and even purple or black.

Alternative Engagement Rings

8. Every precious gem is rated for hardness using the Mohs scale. This is a measure of how resistant the stone is to being scratched. Diamonds top out at 10 on the Mohs scale and are one of the hardest naturally occurring materials in the world.

9. Gemstones with a Mohs rating of 8 or above are generally recommended for engagement rings, because they can stand up to the rigors of daily wear. Sapphires and rubies both score 9 on the Mohs scale while emeralds are only a 7.5 and opals ae just a 6.

10. In some countries, engagement rings don’t feature gemstones at all. The Claddagh ring, a traditional Irish ring, has a motif depicting a pair of hands clasped around a heart and a crown, symbolizing love, friendship and loyalty. While some more modern variants incorporate a ruby or other precious stone, the original version does not have a gemstone set in it.

For dozens more fascinating engagement ring facts, a hundred in all, check out ROX’s guide to All Things Engagement Rings.

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Gem Gossip Visits Sunday & Sunday Antiques, NE Ohio

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

A look into one of Sunday & Sunday Antiques’ ring boxes

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

Diamonds rings and pocket watch chains are just some of their specialties

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

You can shop these: turquoise, opal & garnet, opal cluster

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

You can shop these: Rhodolite garnet dangle, opal cluster, rhodolite and pearl dangle

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

Cameos are one of Carolyn’s most favorite kind of jewelry

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

This Topaz is beckoning you to dive in!

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

Lots of diamond rings and two bangles

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

You can shop these: opal & garnet, turquoise, opal cluster

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

Shop my necklaces here & here

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

Some of my personal favorites, all are available!

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

Where shall I begin???

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

Shop these from left to right: here, here, here, here

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

Just a cool cat cameo, shop him here

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

Love these three dainty necklaces, shop these here, here, here

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

One of the most intricate and fancy blackamoors I’ve ever seen!

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

Sunday & Sunday has a great selection of signet rings

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

A diamond and sapphire Art Deco brooch/necklace pendant, so stunning!

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

A closer look into the ring box…

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

Which elongated diamond ring is your favorite?!

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

Love the variety of turquoise rings, shop here, here, here

Sunday & Sunday Antiques | Gem Gossip Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

Shop the snake ring, synthetic ruby navette, lava cameo

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

Shop the onyx & diamond, blue wedgwood

Sunday & Sunday | Gem Gossip

Putting Ohio on the Jewelry Road Trip map was a goal of mine for this year, and I’m so happy that it started out with an adventurous and jewel-filled excursion to the Northeastern portion of this great state. Carolyn & Ed are a husband and wife dream team that are known as Sunday & Sunday Antiques. With nearly 35 years in the antique business, they are ones you’ll want to bookmark and constantly check their inventory, because with their experience, collectors’ eye and connections, they find some amazing pieces. For me, it all started when I first connected with Carolyn a couple Decembers ago. I stumbled upon an onyx ring with tri-colored gold details from the 1920s and had to have it. I usually discover virtual shops and jewelry to buy via Instagram, and this was an Etsy-browse find–so I made sure to encourage Sunday & Sunday Antiques to join Instagram! A few years later, Carolyn has been hooked since the day she joined and boasts over 31k followers.

I knew visiting with Sunday & Sunday Antiques was going to be fun–lots of inventory (with the best part being that most of it is actually listed, ready to purchase), lots of laughs, and lots of stories. Growing up, Carolyn had always been attracted to shiny things and she even worked at a jewelry store briefly before meeting her sparkliest treasure–her husband Ed! He had grown up in the business, having his dad as his apprentice, learning how to fix and restore watches, as well as repairing jewelry since he was a teenager. While most kids were out running around causing chaos, Ed was tinkering at flea markets and finding things that caught his eye. Once Carolyn & Ed were married, they formed Sunday & Sunday Antiques and set up at antique shows all across the US. They would travel all around, buying and selling, making memories and friends along the way.

Carolyn made a really smart move by being an early adopter of the Internet. In the antique jewelry world, 8-10 years ago NO ONE was really on the world wide web–only a few big names that have continued to lead the pack had a website, if anything. Sunday & Sunday is a proud member of Ruby Lane, with a platinum status since joining in 2000. They also are on Etsy, which they joined in early 2009. The husband and wife duo complement each other in terms of putting their strengths to work to run their online antique business. Carolyn has got the photography down to a science, with a position-shoot-next method that will turn heads. She also is in charge of listing, answering emails, shipping and appraising. Ed does a lot of the buying and meticulously restores and checks each piece before listing. He has a knack for perfection and in a business like this, customers appreciate that. Transitioning their business from traveling shows to strictly online-only has been a great leap of faith, but one they are enjoying to the fullest and very thankful for every step of the way. And don’t mention the word retirement to either of them–antiques are a way of life!

The passion that both Ed & Carolyn have for antiques and antique jewelry resonates throughout every part of their life. It was awesome to connect with such great people and get an inside look into their world. I hope you’ve enjoyed seeing it as well through my eyes and be sure to check out more from Sunday & Sunday Antiques around the web:

Sunday & Sunday Antiques

Sunday & Sunday Antiques

North East, Ohio

Ruby Lane

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Jewelry Collection Stories: Amanda of Maejean Vintage

Maejean Vintage Collection Maejean Vintage Collection

I’m so excited to share this month’s Jewelry Collection Story with you all because I know how much we collectively love the Maejean Vintage sisters! You probably own at least one piece from their Etsy shop, with over 12,000 sales made to date, I’m more apt to say you probably own several pieces! I know I do! It is fascinating to think over 12,000+ items have passed through these sisters’ hands–it leads one to be curious as to what is in their personal collections?! What pieces have they come across over the years that they just couldn’t bear to sell?! What jewels struck a chord with Laura and Amanda?

We are so lucky both were eager to share and put together these photos and stories of their collections. We decided to do a two-day, back-to-back event featuring the collections of both sisters–first up is Amanda’s collection, the younger of the two sisters!

Amanda’s Collection:

Amanda | Maejean Vintage Collection

These are some of the necklaces in my collection. The most special one is the dog tag that belonged to my Pop-Pop when he was in the USMC. I feel honored to have inherited it. The garnet cluster pendant was a Valentine’s Day present from my honey. I adore it! Sometimes I wear it on a long gold chain and other times I wear it as a choker.

Amanda | Maejean Vintage Collection

My most recent acquisition: an antique pale amethyst with a seed pearl halo which I wear in memory of my Aunt Cindy.

Amanda | Maejean Vintage Collection

My favorite bracelets are the gold filled bangles that I love to stack, and the two silver bracelets I inherited from my mother (the charm and the cuff), which she use to wear when she was in her twenties. The platinum and diamond pin is a family heirloom that I occasionally wear on a chain or a dress for special occasions!

Amanda | Maejean Vintage Collection Amanda | Maejean Vintage Collection

Left: I don’t wear earrings often, but when I do I keep it simple with the Victorian paste stones, or dress it up with my garnet dangles. Right: Vintage and antique rings in my jewelry collection. I am always on the look out for rings that feature sparkly old cut diamonds, endearing terms (my PET ring is one of my favorites!), or unique shapes!

My vintage jewelry collection really started around the time my sister and I opened our online vintage jewelry store, Maejean Vintage, in 2010. My collection is definitely smaller than I would ideally like, because I have such a hard time keeping pieces for myself! I know a lot of other sellers have that same guilty feeling when keeping a piece instead of selling it! Because of this, I only keep a piece in my collection if I absolutely ADORE it and it speaks to me on a personal level.

When I first started collecting, I was drawn to dainty and intricate pieces, mostly from the Art Deco Era. As my knowledge of different eras developed, so did my collection! My jewelry consists of pieces from the Victorian, Edwardian, Art Deco, Mid Century, and Modern eras. I am finding myself more drawn to bigger and bolder pieces as time goes on. I especially have a soft spot for rings!

Being a student at GIA has introduced me to the wonderful world of gemstones, so I am definitely drawn to gemstone jewelry — especially diamonds, garnets, emeralds and sapphires!

I have had the best luck finding jewelry for my personal collection at antique flea markets – especially the large flea market that happens three times a year in Brimfield, MA! I love flea markets because it really is like a big treasure hunt and I also enjoy the ability to haggle ;). eBay and Etsy have also been great marketplaces for finding unique pieces from all over the globe!

A lot of my pieces have strong sentimental value to me and represent people, places, or different times in my life. I recently acquired this amethyst and seed pearl ring which I wear in memory of my aunt, who adored the color purple. Seed pearls can represent tears, which is also very fitting.

Antique jewelry is my biggest passion – I love imagining where the pieces have been, and who cherished them before they came to me. I feel so lucky to have a career in connecting other people with sparkly old gems! <3

xoxoGemGossip

WANT MORE? Check out the other Jewelry Collection Stories

You can follow Maejean Vintage –> @MaejeanVintage

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Festive 2016 collection

Sayuri has been known for its thematic well planned seasonal collections but it always wasn’t the case.

Sayuri has been known for its thematic well planned seasonal collections but it always wasn’t the case. When I started Sayuri in 2008, I wasn’t trying to cater to a particular audience who like thematic pieces, I was attempting to strike a chord with every woman who wanted something unique and special, something that she would not find anywhere. So I made ranges of jewelry – pieces to fit every style, every color and every price point. Eight years later, life has come a full circle for me and here is a Festive collection that is literally a collection of random thoughts, concepts, and designs.
Presenting pieces from the Festive 2016 collection that are in shades or blue and pink. I’ll post the remaining designs in a following post.

Festive 2016 collection

Unique, handmade colorful beaded necklaces with a variety of interesting mixed media pendants.

Vibrant Lotus Necklace – A long statement necklace with a Lotus paper and resin pendant and multicolored beads
Luminescent sea – Inspired by the frothy sea waters and floating algae the beaded necklace of glass and howlite beads come with a shimmery mixed media pendant.

Beach sparkle necklace – Silk cord necklace with glass beads and a silver foil – paper pendant set in resin
At Indian beaches you can see a rare sight – of women dressed up in silks, flowers and in their finest jewels (particularly during festivals) as opposed to being in quick drying beachwear as in other countries. My necklace though made in traditional blues and greens of the beach theme have elements like silk cord, rhinestones and metal foil to as an ode to this interesting fashion adaptation that is based on a social agenda of looking your best when you go out with your family.

Colors pops – Looped beaded necklace in bright colors with brass links. Picture a Saturday evening at the beach during sunset – its cool, a bit crowded and completely colorful with an energetic vibe. Colorful umbrellas, balloons, cotton candy stalls, and kites dot the beach completely replacing the brown and blue color spectrum with lots of vibrant colors.

Reflections Dew Drop: Icy blue crystal necklace with a Silver foil pendant that has a matt blue patina on it. For added interest I have used silver foil glass beads and silver crystals along with purple glass beads and a double sided purple and green matt crystal bead. The necklace has a lot of intrinsic shine but without that blingly over the top rhinestone type of shine.

So how do you like these pieces? yes, some of them were made for various challenges (ABS, BNB – “The day at the beach”, etc,.) and with certain tweaks, I thought that they would all fit in.
They are all available for sale, please email me to buy

I hope you find it interesting
Cheers

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September ABS – Expression of impressions

As a design student in the early 2000’s the art movement that I was most drawn to was impressionism. Everything about the movement – from how it came into existence, it journey including Neo and post impressionism, the artists, their style, and the range of subjects fascinated.

As a design student in the early 2000’s the art movement that I was most drawn to was impressionism. Everything about the movement – from how it came into existence, it journey including Neo and post impressionism, the artists, their style, and the range of subjects fascinated. The more art and design history I studied, the more I started relating to the overall Positivist philosophy of art which is the rejection of Romantic subjectivism in favor of the objective description of the ordinary world. Impressionism, Post-impressionism, Expressionism, Fauvism are all the art movements of the positivist age and are linked not just by the time period or brushstroke technique but also by the treatment of a subject that implied a certain degree of distortion. While Impressionism is more fluid and spontaneous, expressionism is more intense and emotional. Artists like Van Gogh were able to successfully bridge both.

Pebeo paint jewelry


September’s Art bead Scene challenge is to create an art bead/components or Jewelry with art beads inspired by Paula Modersohn-Becker’s “Old Woman from the Poorhouse in the Garden with Glass Ball and Poppies” which is an expressionist style of painting. While I found the colors in the painting calling to me, I somehow could not comprehend the imagery. I found it closer to Paul Gauguin’s primitivist impressionism works maybe due to the presence of brown skin tone and rust colored clothing.

You might wonder how difficult can it be to decode a picture of a woman holding flowers, but I didn’t find it compelling. So I took a leaf out of Edvard Munch’s Scream and Anxiety – the classic textbook reference in Expressionism, I decided to make pendants with streaks of colors and visual texture that is visible in Paula’s painting. Again I wasn’t very convinced by the color palette that was provided, so I proceeded to make my own from the painting. In usual design school style (where only a maximum of five colors are allowed in the color board) I picked an unconventional palette of reddish rust, muted blue, pale green, deep mustard and one neutral black.

Pebeo paint jewelry canvas

 

Expression of impressions
Beyond the given painting, my inspiration comes from me visit to the Modern art gallery – particularly the Impressionist wing at the Metropolitan museum of art. So I call my work as my Expression of impressions on my mind there.
The first pendant is based on an idea I have been wanting to try for a very long time Mini canvas like pendants. For this piece I used artists’ canvas as the base and played around with Pebeo Prisma colors that I got at Michaels. In my metal image of the inspiration picture I saw bluish purple ( I guess that was my impressionist brain mixing colors by itself) so the pendant has a large dose of bluish purple in it due to which it looks cooler than the painting. I am still exploring bail and necklace options for it (nothing seems to work) so I am open to suggestions.
 
enamelled metal pendant

I was not sure if just a colored canvas pendant would be considered a valid entry for the challenge, so I made another. I used an embossed copper circle, that was flame painted and partially enamelled with Vitreous crackle enamel (made by me at beadfest). I added pebeo paints and Ice resin jewel tints to get paints streaks and texture on it. This just has a hole on the top as I am figuring out bead options to make it into a necklace.

air chasing on copper jewelry
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Book Review – Jewellery design by Elizabeth Galton

If you have ever walked into a fashion, art or design school library, chances are that you would have come across the “Basics Series” by Ava Publishing.

If you have ever walked into a fashion, art or design school library, chances are that you would have come across the “Basics Series” by Ava Publishing. From Advertising to Typography, they have about 19 main titles and innumerable subtitles providing in-depth knowledge of all art, design, and fashion related industries. The Book “Jewellery design by Elizabeth Galton” is a part of the Fashion series (book no. 10) and is a must read for all jewellery designers, artists, managers, retailers and instructors.

The book is divided into seven main chapters which cover everything from the history of jewellery to jewellery styles and ethical practices, from research, Design development, realisation and marketing to introducing case studies of different jewellers, artists and designers from across the world. This 184-page book offers a 360 perspective of the jewellery industry making the reader want for more. Elizabeth gives an insight into the lives of jewelry designers like Stephen webster, Anne Kazuro Guinnet,Theo Fennell and Shaun Leane through expert interviews that offer real advice. Answers to questions like “What do you look for in a junior designer?” or “How do you identify a target market?” are particularly enlightening. Though this book was published in 2012, I think its valid even today. But I do hope for a newer edition soon discussing new media opportunities in design.

The first two chapters are set in a design school process based subject style with lots of input on fashion basics, terminology, fashion through ages and style identification. Discussion of the styles of various designers are thought provoking and opens up new vistas of thinking. You also get input on ethical design and fair trade policies.
The next chapter offers insight on basic design process methodology used by most designers. It talks about the need for trend research, how to create a mood board and discusses modes of research.

The fourth chapter begins with a description of a design brief and talks about how designers use them to ideate, generate forms and come up with concepts. The book talks about the importance of pencil or rough sketches, the requirement of technical drawings, how the final designs are selected and how they are converted into CADs for production. The chapter details range design, project management, recording and review of the collection in addition to CAD-CAM which I found fascinating.

Chapter five is a hodgepodge of sorts. It begins with jewelry management and details the roles of various people involved in the design, production, and marketing of jewelry. It also discusses hallmarking, sampling, pricing. Strangely, the author, here, talks about materials – gold, vermeil, sterling silver which feels very odd. Maybe a separate chapter focussing on materials would have been better.
Chapter six is all about presentation. It begins with inputs on photography, branding, look book and portfolio generation, packaging and branches on creating a web/virtual presence through PR and Social media marketing.the sequencing feels confused.

Chapeter seven details the various career aspects that a jewelry design aspirant might have and details grants available, schemes, awards and corporate projects. The book ends with a solid glossary, a fantastic list of references and a few more interviews. At the very end, we see a teaser from another Basics – fashion design series “working with ethics” which is quite thought provoking.

I am a very tough critic (my students would know!) and I hardly approve of anything but I love this book. I think that this book is for everybody (beginner or expert) who wants to be a part of jewellery industry as it provides invaluable input to self-taught artists who do not have a design background and sharpens the dull schooled minds with a dose of reality.
Where to buy:
Follow these links: Amazon.com (International) Amazon.in (India)

As this is a fantastic book resource, I didnt feel like sharing high res images of the pages of the book. Hence the dull cell phone pics. I hope that it wouldn’t deter you from seeking out the book. This book is now on my wishlist of things to buy as this particular copy is from the library 🙂

I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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Top Ten of the BEST Rings Available at EraGem

Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip

I love browsing EraGem frequently to view their new arrivals in case there is something I can’t live without! EraGem has such a great selection and keen eye for providing the best in antique and estate jewelry. With the company based in Bellevue, Washington, visiting the store is may not be an option for many, including myself. Luckily their inventory is updated regularly online and easy to shop from the goodness of my computer screen. Recently, I went ahead with my usual check-in to EraGem.com and had way too many favorites! And like a dream come true, I got to pick my TOP TEN favorite rings currently available and they were all sent to me for “review.” And by “review,” I mean play with, lust over and stare at!

I obviously had way too much fun with this group of ten–each one unique in its own way and highly covetable. So, without further ado–here are my TOP TEN from EraGem:

Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip

1. Aquamarine–a gemstone named after seawater, with such a calming blue color. This particular ring available from EraGem really caught my eye not only because of the gemstone but the bi-color gold. Green gold and rose gold is a rare and unique combination–you can see it here in this ring. The aqua is approximately 1.70 carats and is circa 1940s. Price: $1,799 (click on photo for details)

2. Wow, jaw-dropping in every way possible! If you are looking for a statement-making opal ring, this is it! It truly glows thanks to the play-of-color of the opal as well as it being categorized as a jelly opal (more transparent than a typical opal). To make it even more outstanding, the setting is so beautiful with the perfect amount and size diamonds. This opal is its own galaxy and from every different angle, it looks different. Love it! Price: $4,499 (click on photo for details)

Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip

3. If you follow my blog you know I love malachite! Vintage malachite rings are getting harder and harder to find, at least in my opinion. This particular ring is from the 1960s and I love the size and heft of it. So comfortable and a piece that would fit in with any wardrobe. The diamonds on both sides are a cool touch and the split shank is pretty cool too. Price: $1,899 (click on photo for details)

4. Comfort level, 10 out of 10! This handmade twist ring is one of those that you put on and never take off. I love the hammered finish and the maker’s mark is hand etched on the inside of the ring. I can see and feel the time and effort it took to handmake this ring. One end is set with an emerald, the other is set with a champagne diamond. A unique duo for such an eclectic ring. Price: $1,469 (click on photo for details)

Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip

5. I love a good architecturally bold gold ring–this particular piece jumped out at me while browsing EraGem. Let me just say for the record, this ring in person is quite different than any photo could show. The feel and smoothness of this ring when worn is so hard to photograph, but it is totally all there! It is one of those rings that when you put it on, you’re one with the ring. Sounds weird, but if you collect and wear rings, you know what I mean! Love the design, love the feel. Marked 18k “Gabriel” and would love to know more about the ring’s origins. Price: $1,599 (click on photo for details)

6. A cameo unlike any cameo, striking at first for its color, then once you realize the army green shade contrasting against the purple/brown hue, you start to really like and want this ring! I don’t own many cameos–shell cameos tend to not go well with my skin color and my wardrobe. But THIS. On another level! The seed pearls surrounding the hardstone cameo add a feminine touch. Price: $1,999 (click on photo for details)

Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip

7. A cocktail ring is named a cocktail ring because of pieces like this! The true definition. And can we talk about the lapis and turquoise combination?! An underrated duo. This ring deserves some sunny skies and a nice refreshing beverage. I like it for the index or middle finger, definitely. And yes, statement-making enough to wear alone, no other rings. Extra bonus with the pyrite flecks in the lapis. Price: $2,399 (click on photo for details)

8. Faceted hematite? Have you seen a ring like this before?! Apparently faceted hematite was a thing in the 1970s, unfortunately I feel like a lot of this type of jewelry got melted. This ring truly knocked my socks off and I kinda fell in love. I like darker stones and may have an overload of onyx, so acquiring this ring was cool for my collection–another stone on the dark side that wasn’t an onyx or black enamel. Yes, you heard that right–I loved it so much I couldn’t bear sending it back to EraGem with the others. Price: mine.

Era Gem | Gem Gossip Era Gem | Gem Gossip

9. Probably the most photogenic out of the bunch and for good reasons. This massive crystal opal ring is stunning. I couldn’t stop staring at it. Whoever ends up with this ring will have many, many wonderful years looking into this galactic opal. It is truly mesmerizing. The metal on the inside of this flower ring is antiqued, meaning it is blackened which makes everything stand out even more–both the colors of the opal and the design of the ring. EraGem has really outdone itself with this one! Price: $4,999 (click on photo for details)

10. Last but certainly not least, I picked this pear-shaped opal ring because not everyone loves a huge, cocktail ring and not everyone loves yellow gold. This ring is done in 14k white gold and is classic through and through. Perfect for a graduation gift or for someone who has a birthday or anniversary in October. The diamonds that surround the opal are bright, white and sparkle like crazy. Price: $1,499 (click on photo for details)

This post was brought to you in collaboration with EraGem.

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June ABS – Nouveau roses

The inspiration for the June Art bead scene monthly challenge is an art nouveau-esque poster by John Louis Rhead which shows a young woman reading a magazine. As a teacher of costume history and history of design, I delved deep to analyse the artwork which is quite simple with a lot of recognisable elements from that period.Art Nouveau is a design movement that was at its peak between 1890’s and the world war I

The inspiration for the June Art bead scene monthly challenge is an art nouveau-esque poster by John Louis Rhead which shows a young woman reading a magazine. As a teacher of costume history and history of design, I delved deep to analyse the artwork which is quite simple with a lot of recognisable elements from that period.

Art Nouveau is a design movement that was at its peak between 1890’s and the world war I. It is characterized by flat, decorative patterns; intertwined organic forms such as stems or flowers with writhing plant forms, called Foliate forms, a curvilinear depiction of leaves and flowers and vines, sinuous Whiplash lines (identified by their curves and counter curves) along with right-angled forms. The movement is more than a century old, its aesthetics, however, continue to be visible in everyday objects even today. Grill gates and balcony railings with foliate and curvilinear forms are perfect examples of this movement.

“Literary Poster for the Century Magazine”, June 1896
by John Louis Rhead
Original Lithographic Poster Printed in Colour with Letterpress

I call this poster Nouveau-esque as it contains elements from both Aesthetic and Art Nouveau movements. While the rendering is flat, the details seem to be a bit less ornamental than the later art nouveau period. From the context (pose, background and hairstyle) of the woman I think that she could be a well read, fashionable aesthete and a nature lover (strolling barefoot in the garden). She has pale skin, red (henna colored hair) and is seen wearing an “Aesthetic dress” in teal, and roses in her hair. She is also surrounded by rose plants in the garden which surprisingly have no leaves.

As this image already has elements from two, although related, art movements, I decided to keep my design simple with direct inspiration from the image. Initially, I wanted to use wire to create curvilinear forms and suspend roses on them but somehow the piece looked very undesirable. So I decided to create a pendant for this challenge and a simple cord necklace to go with it.


The base layer the pendant is made of resin and the cured piece has been ice enamelled and colored with enamel paints in multiple layers and sealed (picture on the left) and then painted with acrylic paint. Then the roses were drawn by removing the base paint to create a wood etching/engraving sort of look and finally colored in red. I was experimenting with my camera settings while taking pictures and didnt realise until now that the pendant looks differently in different pictures.

I have used colors like yellow, orange, red, green, teal and a streak of purple to compliment and balance all that yellow. This piece is truly mixed media, as it has a resin art pendant, silk thread cord, lampwork flower beads made by Artisan Jyothi (yes, I have been hoarding them all these years) and copper wire.

Art nouveau is a style that comes to me instinctively when I paint but I found it very hard to translate the same aesthetics into jewelry. I think this is the fourth version that I tried and at one point I was like “I’ll just make a wire spiral and be done with it”. For now, I am happy with what I have achieved. The whiplash curves on the wire work and the illustration on the pendant and the foliate tendrils on which the flowers bloom are quintessentially art nouveau. Maybe, I‘ll work more on increasing the stability of the piece as the lampwork flowers are quite fragile.


I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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Las Vegas Antique Jewelry Show 2016

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First stop, Lenore Dailey’s booth–always. Great jewelry, great gossip and a feast for the eyes.

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Excalibur Jewelry always has some stunners–like these opals and gigantic emerald. OakGem had this malachite Egyptian Revival pendant I flipped over.

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Sky Gems boasting this fabulous tray of various corundum and emeralds. The trio of crowned hearts from Lowther Antiques is SO special!

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Lenore Dailey’s booth had this jaw-dropping faceted amethyst pendant, I couldn’t stop staring! And this opal ring is INSANE–I snapped this photo just as I was leaving and don’t remember whose booth it is from.

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Both these photos are from Key Amour, owner Dana is so nice! I love the opal pendant it just glowed. And the stack of rings from her booth was fun to create.

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A booth shot of Mary Ann-tiques’ booth, always full of great items, you gotta look long and hard. The next photo is actually me with a bunch of antique reproductions and I appreciated the vendor immediately disclosing this as soon as I asked about them!

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Ann Marie Stanton always has some really interesting pieces! Love this Egyptian Revival pendant and carved opal brooch.

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Had to stop by Jogani’s booth and be immediately mesmerized by his diamond rings. His handmade ring boxes wowed me too!

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Lucy Verity had the cutest little Victorian ring box, nestled with the daintiest Victorian rings! We also loved the snake wrapped around the crescent moon brooch found at Under the Crown.

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My next stop was Jacob’s Estate Jewelry where I oogled over all the jewelry, especially these artisan-made earrings set with really interesting opaque gems. Sugilite is the funky, deep-purple colored gem used in the one pair.

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Prepare to be amazed by this huge emerald ring, weighing in at 19.86 carats! Found at Pat Saling’s booth. The other photos is LOTS of diamond Art Deco rings from Lenore Dailey’s booth.

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The most glorious opal rings from The Gold Hatpin, seen here. And another piece from Pat Saling, set with an abundance of colored gemstones, creating a rainbow burst for your wrist!

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Platt Boutique had a great lineup of really interesting, noteworthy bracelets. I love the heavy gold ones. And the urn mourning ring was an awesome find, from Lowther Antiques!

Ah, another year in Las Vegas for the annual jewelry shows has come and gone! I arrived late the night before in Vegas and made sure I had a hearty room service dinner to prepare for the next day spent at the Las Vegas Antique Jewelry Show, opening day! This year I tagged along with Katie of Vada Jewelry who was buying unique pieces to add to her finely curated antique and vintage jewelry selection of Vada. The vibe on opening day was busy and bustling–seems year after year the show gets more crowded on the first day, and then it tapers off. Day two was by far less busy. I’m a huge fan of how laid back the antique show is compared to other jewelry shows in Vegas. The fact that it opens at 11am rather than 9:30am also is pretty cool in my book.

Rumor has it that next year’s antique show will not be at The Paris, so I’m trying to see how this settles with me, as next year’s Original Miami Beach show is also supposed to be located somewhere other than where it has been for ages! Change–I guess that’s the theme for next year and for people in the antiques industry, we don’t like change! ha!

Two full days at the antique show proved to be ideal (as I learned from last year)–I was able to get some great photos for both my blog and some other projects I was working on. Some shopping was done, bought a couple things for @shopGemGossip and if you’ve been reading my blog since the beginning, I always have to commemorate the trip with a purchase for my own personal jewel box. More on that in a separate post! 😉

Just want to take the time to thank all the wonderful people of the antique jewelry world for making my trip year after year more fun than the last! Check out the captions and above photos for a play-by-play of my two-day antique excursion.

Thanks for another great year, Las Vegas Antique Jewelry Show…can’t wait until next year!

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Thanks to Gossip Gem

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Coral Pink Paper rose jewelry

It fairly common knowledge that roses stand for beauty, love and affection. A rose is a symbol completion, perfection and is effective communicator of emotion

It fairly common knowledge that roses stand for beauty, love and affection. A rose is a symbol completion, perfection and is effective communicator of emotion. What is uncommon though, is that different colors of roses have different meanings. White stands for purity, innocence and respect, yellow for friendship and warmth, red stands for love and passion and pink denotes sweetness, happiness or gratitude and finally black roses stand for death or hatred. I remember these meanings being drilled into my head a decade ago, by a friend of mine who organised “Rose day” celebrations at his college. But then I never bothered to ask what coral or coral-pink roses meant. That is until now.

Coral Pink Paper rose jewelry
After quick online search, I found out that the meaning depends on how pink or how orange the rose is. In the end , however, they all seem to signify love, desire and appreciation. When I started working on a set that required coral pink flowers (more pink than coral though) I wanted it to portray the emotions that it stood for – something that was beautiful and desirable.

If the stunning hot pink aka Maharani Pink Bridal Jewelry, depicted passion and richness then this pink Paper rose jewelry set is about being more elegant. The Indian bride from South Africa for whom I made this set in march, specifically wanted jewellery that matched her coral pink and purple lehengha. Instead of sourcing for coral pink roses ( and frustrating myself in the process as they are hard to find) I used baby pink roses and distressed them with orange metallic paint. To match the work on the skirt I used gold and purple beads to complete the set.

Coral Pink bridal flower jewelry

The set comprises of a short necklace, drop earrings, single strand hair ornament matha tikka (a term coined by my student to describe a single strand matha patti) and Haath phool bracelets. I made the bracelets adjustable with a gold cord tie up.


I think that this is the shortest post in JOS history, but for once I wanted to let the pictures do the talking. Do share your thoughts on it. I am thankful that I was able to write the bulk of this post last week as I had a nasty fall on Monday and my head is still quite not right. I hope that it gets sorted by my birthday tomorrow.

I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

[||||Thanks to:jewelsofsayuri blog|Special thanks to:jewelsofsayuri blog|Greetings to:jewelsofsayuri blog |Source: jewelsofsayuri|More at:jewelsofsayuri blog|

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