Jewelry Collection Stories: Lindsey of @ParkAvenueAntiques

Park Avenue Antiques Park Avenue Antiques Park Avenue Antiques Park Avenue Antiques

I’ve followed Lindsey of Park Avenue Antiques for a very long time! My first interaction with her was sort of humorous–I remember being on my way out the door to go antiquing for the day with my mom and sister. I was waiting on a ring to go up on the auction block so I unpleasantly made them wait until it did, not realizing it wouldn’t be until another 45 minutes. I can’t remeber exactly why I lost out on the ring, but while in the car finally on our way, I took a screenshot of the ring and posted it on Instagram with the caption, “Who outbid me on this portrait ring?! Confess!!” Lindsey was sweet enough to message me to tell me she had been the final bidder on it and graciously offered it for sale. A story too good to be made up, I’ve treasured that ring ever since! Over the years, we’ve continued to follow each other–even one point I tried meeting up at an antique show, but kept missing her! Hopefully meeting will be in the cards for us in the future, but until then…let’s check out her amazing jewelry collection!

Like many of you, I have been attracted to sparkly things for as far back as I can remember. As a little girl, I collected rocks and minerals, little buttons and sea glass. My father was an antiques dealer and the two of us were always on an “antiquing adventure”. One of our favorite places to visit was Roycroft Antiques in East Aurora, NY. They had a wooden whisky barrel filled with buttons and beads and I would dig through that barrel until my hands were black! Who knows what I thought I’d find in there! It was all about the hunt….

Park Avenue Antiques Park Avenue Antiques

I share this silver filigree necklace with my daughter Cameron. The three Edwardian silver bears represent her and her two brothers.

Around the age of 5, we moved to Hershey, Pennsylvania. It was a difficult transition. My parents both worked two jobs and I was home alone a lot. My mother always found ways to show me how much I was loved and that she was thinking of me. She came up with a hide and seek game we called “Rubber Legs” which involved hiding a yellow plastic figure. Before she left for work in the morning, she would hide Rubber Legs somewhere for me to find. Then I would hide him somewhere for her. I almost always hid him in her antique spool cabinet/jewelry box. It was a magical place where I wasn’t supposed to “dig around” but I couldn’t help myself! There were sparkly rings, beautiful strings of trade beads, flapper necklaces and cameos. She had all kinds of treasures but my favorite piece was a little gold acorn charm that rattled when shaken.

Once we moved to Hershey, adventures in antiquing with dad still continued. He opened an antique lighting shop in Adamstown, PA in the Black Angus Antiques Mall. Most Sundays I would tag along to help him but really spent most of my days with other dealers. I was fascinated with their knowledge in various fields and eager to hear their stories. This is where my love for jewelry and antiques really started.

Park Avenue Antiques Park Avenue Antiques

LEFT: Georgian sapphire and rose cut diamond bow brooch in silver topped gold, purchased at the Las Vegas Antique Jewelry & Watch Show

When collecting jewelry became a serious passion, I invested in books. Jewelry books on private collections, construction, symbolism, intaglios, various periods and markings. My jewelry library has helped me to educate myself and develop a true respect for the craftsmanship and symbolism that these pieces hold. I try to add one book to my collection every month. I would encourage any aspiring jewelry collector to do this as well.

RIGHT: Eight years ago, I was newly divorced and the only jewelry I had was my and my grandmothers wedding ring. I put some money aside and decided I’d like to create a piece of jewelry that would represent my family. I hoped to create a ring that could be passed on to one of my children. The first jeweler I went to was a rather unpleasant experience. I nearly gave up on my idea but decided to give it one more try. This is when I met Skip Colflesh, the owner of The Jeweler’s Bench in Hershey, PA. He helped me create the perfect ring. We used the diamonds in my grandmothers wedding ring, my engagement ring and each of the children’s birthstones. The first time I saw the ring it was an emotional experience. It was a perfect representation of my life’s journey. The diamonds no longer felt like the loss of a loved one or a failed marriage – they were now something beautiful and very personal. But more than that, I was so grateful for the friendship that had come out of designing the ring together. Skip has become one of my dearest friends and also my mentor. Friends make all the difference.

Park Avenue Antiques

I really don’t have a specific type of jewelry or period that I collect. I am mostly drawn to gemstones and figural pieces but my collection is quite varied. My most heavily worn pieces of jewelry are my watch chains. I love connecting them together for different looks and wearing them with various pendants.

Here are a few of my favorite necklaces:

LEFT: Painted enamel mourning locket depicting a young girl and her dog. It reads “Mary Rutherfurd Prime April 16, 1810 – Died September 9, 1835”

SECOND FROM LEFT: Opal pendant from Arts & Crafts Movement. This pendant reminds me of my favorite spring flower, lilac, and the opals are absolutely electric. I bought this in an antique store in England.

THIRD FROM LEFT: Not easy to pick a favorite, but if I had to, this would be it! Raj Era moonstone pendant from @saintespritofchelsea Beautifully crafted in silver and gold with huge shimmering moonstone cabochons.

CENTER: 19th c Kerosang with faceted white zircon.

Park Avenue Antiques

Here are a few of my favorite rings:

Victorian era amethyst and pearl serpent ring was purchased from David Ashville of Ashville Fine Arts.

The kunzite and diamond ring I bought from @blackamooruk. I believe this ring was originally an early 20th century brooch that was carefully converted. I love the size of the kunzite and it fits my finger perfectly.

The Victorian topaz ring was purchased from @ishyantiques.

The art deco moonstone ring is one of my favorites. It was purchased from Brad Wilson of Wilson’s Estate Jewelry in Philadelphia, PA.

The massive cameo ring I created using a 19th century cameo from @antiquestoreinwayne and a custom gold setting created by Skip Colflesh @thejewelersbenchofhershey.

Park Avenue Antiques Park Avenue Antiques

LEFT: Agate tree ring – This is one of my creations. I used an agate sourced from an old cufflink mounted in a setting made by @thejewelersbenchofherehey Victorian chrysoberyl and gold band @westandsonjewellery

RIGHT: This is my most recent purchase. My dear friend Will @martindaleasianarts recently took me on a day trip to a quaint town about an hour outside of London where I found it in an antiques shop.

Thank you for giving me this opportunity. I am honored to be a part of the Instagram jewelry community. Your posts have greatly enhanced my knowledge and appreciation for all types of jewelry and the friendships that have developed because of our shared passion for jewelry are priceless to me.

xoxoGemGossip

WANT MORE? Check out the other Jewelry Collection Stories

You can follow Lindsey –> @ParkAvenueAntiques

Source: GossipGem.com

Continue Reading

Doyle & Doyle Debuts Rare Collection of Antique Jewels

1 doyle doyle antique jewelry rings crosses

Doyle & Doyle is thrilled to debut pieces from a spectacular cache of rare antique jewels, all acquired from a single collector. Including jewelry from ancient Rome, 17th century Spain, and 19th century France, these are the best examples of their type and many are hallmarked by well known jewelers. Keep reading for a sneak peek of the historic collection before it goes on exhibition at Doyle & Doyle in September.

2 doyle doyle micromosaic bangle brooch vatican workshop 3 doyle doyle antique micromosaic bangle vatican workshop

These exquisite micromosaic pieces date to the mid-19th century and are hallmarked for the Vatican Workshop of the Papal State.The Vatican’s mosaic studio was founded in the 16th century, its skilled artisans create artworks commissioned by wealthy patrons and pieces for the Pope to give as gifts. The Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo, Saint Peter’s Square designed by Bernini, and Raphael’s “The School of Athens” are among the many masterpieces you can discover at the Vatican. Originally founded in the 16th century, the skilled artisans working in the Vatican’s mosaic studio create pieces for the Pope to give as gifts and artworks commissioned by wealthy patrons. They also oversee and maintain the ten thousand square meters of colorful mosaics that adorn Saint Peter’s Basilica. This bangle and brooch are beautifully made, featuring glass tesserae so tiny that the designs look like paintings in shades of red, blue, green, and white. Perhaps a wealthy young man purchased them during his Grand Tour through Europe, or they were gifts to an important Church official. No matter their origin, they are little works of art that display the incredible skill of the Vatican’s workshop.

4 doyle doyle antique spanish gold crucifix choker long gold chains

The collection includes other ecclesiastical jewels in addition to the Vatican micromosaics, including a variety of gem-set and enameled crosses from many different periods. This striking dimensional crucifix cross is Spanish from the 17th century, detailed with enamel and engraving that resembles wood grain. Although probably not original, we love it worn on the black ribbon choker, especially when layered with antique gold guard chains. Although these are museum quality jewels, they’re definitely wearable!

5 doyle doyle antique diamond heart spanish reliquary

There are also charming examples of sentimental and devotional jewelry. The rose cut diamond encrusted heart hangs from a sweet rose gold dove. The diamonds are foil backed and you can see hints of pink, gold, and even green reflecting through the stones. The rare late 17th century Spanish reliquary pendant is a small compartment that holds a tiny bit of a saint’s blood. It’s backed by a hand painted figure of a female saint and framed by emeralds and garnets. This type of jewel was probably a private devotional artwork. Spain being an intensely Catholic country, people believed in the power of saints to affect their daily life. In additional to more traditional liturgy, 17th century Spaniards prayed to their personal saint to intervene and make their lives better.

6 doyle doyle arts and crafts turquoise pendant art nouveau enamel winged female pendant Gaston Laffitte

The other half of this incredible collection is comprised of museum quality Arts & Crafts and Art Nouveau jewelry. The Arts & Crafts Movement was a direct response to the mechanization and poor working conditions engendered by the Industrial Revolution in the mid-19th century. Adherents looked to the Middle Ages, nature, and popular folk art for inspiration, seeking to return to an idyllic time before mass production. Shying away from precious materials, Arts & Crafts jewelers favored readily available gemstones, such as garnet, amethyst, citrine, opal, and moonstone. The delicate gold pendant is British, comprised of hand wrought wirework set with bright blue turquoise and glowing moonstone.

7 doyle doyle art nouveau plique a jour enamel necklace Gaston Laffitte silver locket Lucien Coudray

By the end of the century, Art Nouveau artists took the theme of nature to the next level. Art Nouveau jewelry often incorporated idealized female forms with swirling, whiplash hair framed by sensuous flora, like this striking silver mirror locket. Dating to 1900, this lovely piece is hallmarked for French jeweler Lucien Coudray. Coudray specialized in engraving medals and won several prizes for his artistry. Another popular form was a winged female with gossamer enamel wings studded with tiny gems or pearls. This statuesque dragonfly woman was created around 1900 and bears the hallmark of noted Art Nouveau jeweler, Gaston Laffitte. The light filters through the translucent green plique-a-jour enamel wings, creating a delicate stained glass effect.

This is just a small preview of the incredible historic collection – want to see it all? Doyle & Doyle is putting on a public exhibition in September. Email [email protected] for more information and to get on the invite list!

This post was contributed by Juliet Rotenberg of Doyle & Doyle, thank you!!

doyle&doyle

Want more?! To check out the store tour of Doyle & Doyle, click here.

Continue Gossip Gem

Continue Reading

Weekday Wardrobe: New Favorites

Weekday Wardrobe | Gem Gossip Weekday Wardrobe | Gem Gossip

Since coming back from Vegas and NYC, my days have been long and filled with writing and running all kinds of errands. From Sunday morning brunches, to post office runs, to family dinners, my style has been changing daily and almost always depends on what I have planned. Some days I’m lucky if I get a chance to breathe fresh air outside, while other days I’ve spent more time on the road in my car than normal…but that is what I like about being self-employed and I’m excited for the summer.

Most recently, I was playing in my jewelry box and for some reason or another a lightbulb went off–I took my collection of figas and strung them on my hardwire gold collar necklace. As soon as I put the necklace on I knew that this was one of my greatest moves I’ve ever made. I’m obsessed with the look and it totally caters to my collecting mantra by displaying my pieces perfectly. I actually have 6 more figas that don’t have jumprings, so I’m off now to get them put on by my jeweler.

I’ve also been experimenting with different kinds of earrings to create a “full” look, meaning ALL the way up my ear. To achieve this look without the pain of multiple piercings, I suggest some comfortable ear cuffs. Some are more comfortable than others and it depends on the craftsmanship, so try them out–see if you’re able to wear for a full day before committing to buy.

In the first photo shown, I’m wearing a pair of ombré amethyst ear studs with jackets by Jewelmak. These are so cool and give me a pop of color, which is perfect for summertime. I kept it simple up top with 14k gold balls studs in various sizes, a Paige Novick diamond ear cuff and a vintage swirl motif ear cuff I found on Ruby Lane.

The photo below shows off my figa necklace and a carved opal necklace I recently sold. My earring look is simple to recreate; two pearl stud earrings of various sizes and a gold huggie earring from Stacy Nolan.

Weekday Wardrobe | Gem Gossip

Day One: (spent doing emails all day and typing blog posts, hence the Beavis & Butthead t-shirt)

Elongated lapis and enamel ring, from Sarah’s Vintage & Estate Jewelry in Buffalo, NY

Antique diamond & sapphire ring from Excalibur Jewelry found in Tucson this year

Pear-shaped vintage lapis ring that I can’t stop wearing because it is so comfortable and bold

Weekday Wardrobe | Gem Gossip

Day Two:

Diamond crossover pinky ring by Halleh Jewelry

“Ring One” from my Gem Gossip Jewelry line, since retired

Fringe ring in 14k yellow gold by Ashley Childs

A stack of “Ring One with diamond” from my Gem Gossip Jewelry line, since retired

Weekday Wardrobe | Gem Gossip

Day Three:

Oval vintage Mexican ring done in 14k yellow gold

Crescent moon ring in 14k yellow gold by Amanda Hunt Jewelry

Dendritic agate ring from Joden Jewelry in Grove City, PA

Weekday Wardrobe | Gem Gossip

Day Four:

Glass + 10k yellow gold ring, heirloom from my Gram

elongated diamond ring turn-of-the-century from my friend Priscilla

Diamond shaped ring set with old cut brown diamonds, from STORE 5a

Weekday Wardrobe | Gem Gossip

Day 5:

turquoise baby rings, worn as pinky ring and midi ring

Victorian turquoise ring from eBay

Victorian turquoise ring with engraving on entire closed-back, from Gold Hatpin

Turquoise and diamond cluster ring found at the Nashville Flea Market

xoxoGemGossip

WANT MORE? Check out my past Weekday Wardrobe posts

Continue Gossip Gem

Continue Reading

Gem Gossip Visits Leslie Hindman Auctioneers in Chicago, IL

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Victorian Earrings: Lot 30, Moonstone Necklace: Lot 17

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Bird brooch: Lot 36, Insect brooch: Lot 43

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Amethyst dangle earrings: Lot 11

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Cartier cigar band: Lot 214, snake ring: Lot 24, emerald ring: Lot 49

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Opal ring: Lot 264, Elongated diamond ring: Lot 515, sapphire ring: Lot 69

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Georgian emerald bracelet: Lot 4

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Peridot necklace (comes with matching earrings): Lot 27

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Opal ring: Lot 264, Morganite ring: Lot 61

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Turquoise and enamel brooch: Lot 33A, blue enamel and diamond brooch: Lot 54, Georgian pearl brooch: Lot 31

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Blue topaz collar necklace: Lot 247

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Aquamarine ring: Lot 48, Moonstone ring: Lot 260, Emerald & diamond ring: Lot 57 —- Glass scarab ring: Lot 8, Amethyst ring: Lot 683, Fire opal ring: Lot 5

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Blue enamel (made to look like lapis) and diamond brooch: Lot 54

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Georgian emerald bracelet: Lot 4, Gothic Revival bracelet: Lot 9, Emerald & diamond ring: Lot 49

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Peridot necklace and matching earrings suite: Lot 27

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Emerald & diamond ring: Lot 12, Emerald & diamond dome lattice ring: Lot 482A, oval opal ring: Lot 42

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Oval opal ring: Lot 42, Emerald & diamond dome lattice ring: Lot 482A, Emerald & diamond ring: Lot 12 —– Sapphire ring: Lot Lot 69, Elongated diamond ring: Lot 515, Opal ring: Lot 264,

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Moonstone Y-Necklace: Lot 17

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Cartier cigar band: Lot 214

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

Gothic Revival bracelet: Lot 9

Leslie Hindman | Gem Gossip

I couldn’t tell you how much I was looking forward to meeting the jewelry team behind the Fine Jewelry Department at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers in Chicago, IL. I’ve been in touch with the infamous windy-city based auction house since finding them online a few years ago. It started off with me registering to bid online at a few of their highlighted jewelry auctions, then I started to feature some of my favorite picks right here on Gem Gossip…then last year I consigned a ring of mine for Leslie Hindman to sell at auction. I was so pleased with how the whole experience panned out, from beginning to end, that I yet again consigned another ring from my personal collection. And what a treat it was to visit in person! Looking through auction catalogs is probably one of my most favorite activities, and to have that experience come to life is a dream come true.

Just as Leslie Hindman Auctioneers seeks out the finest in art, furniture, decorative arts and jewelry, their loyal clients have been bidding with the auction house for years, and have a distinct eye for the best too! Imagine my excitement as I entered the building to find a live auction going on right in front of my eyes–can you believe I’ve never actually been to an auction in real time (besides the car auctions with my dad, but those are outside and umm, unrefined to say the least)?! I received the grand tour and timing was great because all the furniture, fine art and decorative pieces that were currently selling in the auction room were neatly displayed between two large, sun-filled rooms. It looked like walking through an interior decorator’s portfolio. I spotted some gold mirrors and portrait paintings that I couldn’t stop staring at, but headed toward the jewelry department to get down to business.

Leslie Hindman’s Fine Jewelry & Timepieces department consists of Alex Eblen, graduate gemologist and director, James Wallace, graduate gemologist and timepieces specialist, two account specialists Madeline Schroeder & Katie Meyer, another graduate gemologist Meredith Derman, and finally, a cataloguer and jewelry specialist Jamie Henderson. Everyone had set up my favorite jewels in a large spread, front and center of the jewelry department, waiting for their time to shine. This experience for me, is comparable to visiting a dog adoption center–these pieces of jewelry were once loved, worn, and for whatever reason need to find new homes. Just like a dogs, I can’t help but want to take everything home with me! Instead of “cute and cuddly,” the jewels are so gorgeous and jaw-dropping.

Speaking of the jewelry I got to see, everything will be auctioned off on Sunday, April 23rd, 2017 starting at noon CST with the second round starting the following day at 10am, and ultimately complete when the last lot is sold. This auction features 1,238 lots of some of the best pieces of fine jewelry, loose gemstones and timepieces. I’ve gone through and picked my favorites, which are seen here in these photos–a neat glimpse into seeing what the jewelry looks like on! I know every cataloguer in the game does the utmost to fully describe each item, including measurements of how wide and long pieces are, but it’s the buyers that can often overlook those details. I’ve been guilty of this myself–the garnet comet ring I bought at auction surprised me so much when I received it in the mail. It was WAY bigger than what I had thought it would be, even though the millimeter size of the stone was given. It ended up being a good surprise–and I hope these photos help put into perspective what each piece would look like on and how they could potentially fit into your collection!

Here’s all the important links you need to know if you plan on bidding at this sale.

Date: Day One April 23, 2017 NOON CST, Day Two April 24, 2017 10am CST

Link to online catalog

Link to register to bid online

Have questions? email someone from the jewelry department directly at [email protected]


LHA Logotype_2016_Web

1338 W Lake St.

Chicago, IL 60607

www.lesliehindman.com

Follow on Facebook

Follow on Twitter

Follow on Pinterest

Follow on Instagram

Continue Gossip Gem

Continue Reading

Book Review: Christie’s The Jewellery Archives Revealed

Christies Book | Gem Gossip Christies Book | Gem Gossip Christies Book | Gem Gossip Christies Book | Gem Gossip Christies Book | Gem Gossip Christies Book | Gem Gossip Christies Book | Gem Gossip Christies Book | Gem Gossip

Have you ever dreamed of going into the vaults and archives of the infamous, world-renowned auction house Christie’s?! I feel like I dream about that on a daily basis and although I’ve never gotten my chance, author Vincent Meylan may hold the key to unlocking that door with his latest book called Christie’s The Jewellery Archives Revealed. In it, he chronicles some of the most headlining jewelry auctions–from British Royalty jewels, to Elizabeth Taylor’s collection, and everything in between. Mr. Meylan had insider’s access to the Christie’s archives to research for this book, where he brings hundreds of color illustrations, including more than 100 original documents reproduced just for the pages of this tome.

The history behind Christie’s is even more extensive than what I thought–with their first sale being on December 5, 1766! It is interesting to read that during this revolutionary time, the events that took place may have actually benefited Christie’s because so many people of royalty were being sent to the guillotine. Chapter two has quite the attention-grabbing title of “Murdered Queens.” The extensive stories behind each historical piece are quite fascinating, and I am thoroughly enjoying the paintings of the royals as well as photos of the jewels which illustrate the book. It gives you insight into European royalty as well, including history and intriquing stories behind many of their ill-fated lives.

Chapter 11 is a favorite, titled “Diamonds are Christie’s Best Friends,” it chronicles a few of the top-selling, biggest, rarest and most stunning diamonds to ever grace Christie’s auction floor. This chapter opens up about how mysterious and extensive their diamond sales were over the past couple centuries. The earliest diamond consignments reveal not much on where they came from…and in the same breadth, where did they end up once sold? A trio of rubies, for example, went up for auction in 1891. The weight and rarity of any one of these, if they were to resurface, would shatter any record ever set. So astonishing.

Aside from the last chapter, it is noteworthy to check out the Appendix. It lists significant names of pieces/collections that went up for auction by year, starting with the year 1767. It is a great, quick reference as well as a “who’s who” amongst those who sold pieces through Christie’s.

The auction world is quite mysterious, legendary and totally unique. It is one of my favorite parts of my jewelry hobby. This book encompasses all this and more, and should you find yourself daydreaming of all the jaw-dropping jewels that once passed through Christie’s auction house–you might want to buy yourself this book to know exactly how incredible they truly are!

To purchase your own copy of Christie’s The Jewellery Archives Revealed, click below:

Continue Gossip Gem

Continue Reading

Jewelry Collection Stories: Jennifer of @Dupkaspike

Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection

To end out the year, our last Jewelry Collection Story comes from Jennifer, or as many may know her on Instagram, @Dupkaspike. Her collection is eclectic, heavily sentimental and so fun to look at. She captured her collecting essence perfectly in these photos. Now if only I can meet her one day and she them in person! 😉 …take it away Jennifer:

I can’t say that I have always loved jewelry, but I can pinpoint the moment when the love affair began. When I was 16, my Dad took me into Keil’s, an antique jewelry store on Royal Street in New Orleans, and bought me two rings. One was a mother of pearl cameo with an onyx surround, and another was a rose gold carnelian with a gold inlaid intaglio of a Rose of Sharon.

It was an important moment in my understanding of jewelry. My Mom was a big Southwestern jewelry fan (I’ve inherited her collection), but it wasn’t something that resonated strongly with me, though I admired it. I was drawn more to the sentimental, and to the personal.

I did not do a lot of collecting in early adulthood. My husband is Chinese, and so over the years and when we married, I received traditional Chinese 22k gold and jade pieces as gifts, which I look forward to passing on to my children. Traditional Chinese don’t really like lower-karat gold pieces and I liked history and sentiment; so we were in agreement that mall jewelry wasn’t really for me. The jade pieces are my favorites of these, as is a giant 22k dragon and phoenix ring.

Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection

Over the years I have gravitated to certain genres. As an amateur painter, I adore portrait miniatures, and greatly admire the skill required to produce them. I don’t have many, but I’m always on the lookout for special pieces. Recently I acquired a large Georgian locket brooch, from CJ Antiques, surrounded by amethysts and plan to commission a portrait of my kids and dog. One piece I wear often I got from Duvenay, a pretty portrait of Marie Antoinette, with a diamond halo that was converted from a stickpin.

I’m a strong believer in personalization, so mostly every new piece I own has some engraving or dedication on it. When my kids were born, I bought heavy Tiffany Lucida wedding bands and had their names engraved on the outside and their birthdates on the inside. Similarly, I had their names and birthdates engraved on the inside of gemstone and diamond stacking rings. I have several stacking rings, which I love to mix with larger pieces. One set I wear all the time is two ruby keeper rings from Jewellery Hannah, as well as a giardinetto from Pocket of Rocks. Last year I worked with Hoard Jewelry on engraving to flat gold bands for them with personalized messages. One has the cipher of a “nonsense” love song my son used to sing to me as a child when he was barely verbal; only he and I understand it. He later told me that it was his love song to his Mom, and so of course my heart melted. Other antique engraved pieces of jewelry with dedications or initials I own are mostly amatory, including a Russian rock crystal locket with diamond initials on the face that once held hair; a tiny acrostic locket with engraving and locket space for hair; a large, double heart picture frame, and a banded agate mourning locket. A favorite bangle acquired from Lenore Dailey spells, “Dieu Vous Garde,” or “God Protect You.” I also have a locket with that motif. One of my very favorite pieces it is really quite special. I got it from Glorious Antique Jewelry. It is dated 1790 and has some interesting initials on the back, and a lovely message on the front, “Pour ma Sophie pour toujours ma petite cherie toût, 1790” which roughly translates to, “To my Sophie, you will always be my little darling, 1790.”

Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection Dupkaspike Collection

I love LOVE, and as such can’t seem to stop seeking out pansy jewelry. I have several enamel and gemstone pieces—a pendant and pocket watch. Pansy jewelry of course was symbolic of the French for “ Pense à moi,” or “ Think of me.” Similarly a Georgian pendant brooch I find myself wearing often simply says, “ L’Amour,” and is decorated with two seed pearl lovebirds. A garnet and white enamel pendant reads in Latin, “ Dulcis Vita::Tibi Vita,” or “ The Good “ Life; Your Life.” One piece I have, ruby hearts with diamond wings, was acquired from Park Avenue Jewelry and I decided to convert it from a brooch to a necklace. I’m a strong believer that jewelry should be worn, and I realized that it would get a lot more use for me personally as a necklace. I got this piece as my mother was dying, and it will always be very special to me as a remembrance of her.

French St. Esprit pieces are also a love and I get a lot of use out of a French regional cross I found. One of the St. Esprits is probably late 18th century and makes a political statement, with its red and blue pastes. A favorite piece of mine is an 1835 rose cut diamond, gold and silver Halley’s Comet pendant (likely converted from a brooch) that I got from Inez Stodel.

xoxoGemGossip

WANT MORE? Check out the other Jewelry Collection Stories

You can follow Jennifer –> @dupkaspike

More GGem

Continue Reading

Jewels at my Doorstep: FREYWILLE Jewelry

Untitled Frey Wille | Gem Gossip Frey Wille | Gem Gossip Frey Wille | Gem Gossip Frey Wille | Gem Gossip Frey Wille | Gem Gossip Frey Wille | Gem Gossip Frey Wille | Gem Gossip Frey Wille | Gem Gossip Frey Wille | Gem Gossip Frey Wille | Gem Gossip Frey Wille | Gem Gossip Frey Wille | Gem Gossip Frey Wille | Gem Gossip Frey Wille | Gem Gossip Frey Wille | Gem Gossip Frey Wille | Gem Gossip Frey Wille | Gem Gossip

FREYWILLE is a name synonymous with quality and fine craftsmanship. When the Austrian-based company reached out to me to feature their jewelry, I knew exactly how to make it come alive. After all, jewelry is just metal, gems and in FREYWILLE’s case, fine enamel–the moment you wear that jewelry it fulfills its destiny of what the designer intended his or her creation to become. Frey Wille’s new Ultimate Kiss Collection is the latest launch of jewels to be released. The collection is inspired by Gustav Klimt’s world famous masterpiece “The Kiss” and each piece, like all their jewelry, is handmade in their Vienna headquarters where it all started in 1951.

You may have noticed that FREYWILLE often uses famous paintings as inspiration for their fire enameled jewelry and you’re absolutely right! They’ve depicted several artists’ work, many of them being Austrian-born painters. Their first approach at using artwork as inspiration came in the 90s when the Claude Monet Foundation had FREYWILLE create a collection based off the artist. Since then, it has become their signature and their collectors eagerly await to see what the next beautiful scene will be depicted in the designs. As stated, the Ultimate Kiss Collection features Gustav Klimt’s work; the same artist has been featured in previous collections and it has a whimsical, colorful feel–perfect for an 18k yellow gold backdrop.

I love the jewels that were sent to me for this feature. I’ve been a fan of FREYWILLE for awhile now and particularly love their round ring design, which I made sure to be a part of the shoot. Something about the well-made disc, with a dome of enamel and a central diamond just gets me! FREYWILLE has boutiques worldwide–in fact they have over 100 in several different countries, spanning four continents! For my US fans, there are two locations stateside: one in NYC and one in Beverly Hills. For me, this was my first time ever holding a piece of FREYWILLE, as I’ve only seen their jewelry behind glass. And wow, what an experience! To touch the beauty and feel the hard work that has gone into each piece is fulfilling.

The ever-changing, bustling downtown streets of Nashville provided the perfect cool and modern backdrop for this shoot. Each piece popped against the bright orange crushed velvet and proved to be wearable in every sense of the word. Whether your style is sophisticated chic or laidback cool, these jewels from FREYWILLE will pair great with either look. I can’t wait to learn more about this creative company and see what new collections and artwork they will incorporate into their fine line. Happy 65 years FREYWILLE!

Jewels I wore in this feature; all can be found and purchased at shop.freywille.com:

18k Donna Bangle from the Ultimate Kiss Collection

18k and Diamond Nautilus Ring from the Ultimate Kiss Collection

18k Tango Ring from the Ultimate Kiss Collection

18k and Diamond Luna Piccolissima Ring from the Ultimate Kiss Collection

18k and Diamond Luna Piccolissima Pendant with Angel Hair chain from the Ultimate Kiss Collection ​

18k and Diamond Luna Piccolissima Earrings from the Ultimate Kiss Collection

All photography shot by Lauren Newman for GemGossip.com

This post was brought to you in collaboration with FREYWILLE.


FreyWille

Follow on Instagram

Follow on Facebook

Follow on Twitter

Follow on Pinterest

More GGem

Continue Reading

Online Jewelry making classes

I was talking to my friend and fellow blogger a few days back regarding her Europe travels and she remarked that she had only travelled to all those places as she was already stationed abroad and that it requires dedication to travel to another country (and continent) just to learn a skill and better yourself. She, ofcourse was referring to my latest USA travel to attend Beadfest Workshops

I was talking to my friend and fellow blogger a few days back regarding her Europe travels and she remarked that she had only travelled to all those places as she was already stationed abroad and that it requires dedication to travel to another country (and continent) just to learn a skill and better yourself. She, ofcourse was referring to my latest USA travel to attend Beadfest Workshops. Some people might consider me lucky but only I know the hurdles that I had to cross and planning and work that I had to do (and still doing) to make the trip happen.
Many have also written to me asking if I could teach them enamelling or Precious metal clay that I learnt there. As a full time design educator, I am not someone who takes teaching lightly and without really practicing what I had learnt ( I mean I just did it once in a few hours time!) and experimenting with different techniques I cannot teach them.
But this Diwali, we are all indeed lucky. You and me can take any class we want, from world class instructors in the comfort of our our own homes for just $20 at Craftsy. Post contains affiliate links

craftsy classes sale

Yes you heard it right! Craftsy is now having a mega sale on its classes – you can learn anything from water color painting to how to sew a bra or how to solder metal for $20 starting today till Monday. Isn’t this a great Diwali bonus?
The best part about craftsy classes is, once you buy a class, it never expires. So you can watch the demo over and over again or go back to it and watch a particular step if you ever get a doubt which is not possible in a live class which far outweighs the other benefits

 

Craftsy online classes

I do agree that not everything can be learnt online, in a asynchronous platform. As jewelry being a touchy feely subject you might think that learning online might not work out for you. This issue can be simply solved by picking classes and techniques that can easily be learnt online. Here is a handy guide aka cheat sheet to help you figure that out.

How to Pick Jewelry making classes online

1. Material Availability – Pick a class where the materials are easily available to you (locally) or that use materials in stock as you need to be able to practise the skill that you just learned. For E.g – Take a Creative wire jewelry class if you already have base metal or artistic wire and required tools with you
2. Technique Up gradation A new or advanced technique class where you have experience with the material For e.g A Metal Form folding class will help advance your sheet metal skills, A Resin casing and sculpting class will help you further polish your resin jewelry making skills

cheat sheet on how to pick a online class

3. Learning tips and tricks To get guidance from a master – to learn tips and tricks of the trade. If you are self taught in soldering, then taking a course like Soldering Success in Every Scenario will equip you with tips and tricks that you would take years to learn by yourself.
4. International Exposure Pick a class which is not taught locally in your state or country. Believe me, it is much easier (and cheaper) to import materials and try out a technique taught online rather than flying to another country to try learning it, especially if you are not sure if you are going to practice it professionally after learning it. It is almost impossible to find a tutor to teach Torch fired Enamelling in India but it can be easily learnt online.

Pin or print out the above cheat sheet on how to pick a online class and use it as a guide whenever you are faced with a dilemma. Remember to never let your age, health or financial issues come in the way of your learning to be the best that you can be. Whether you are looking to add a new skill to your repertoire or pursue a new hobby, I hope that craftsy’s classes give you the best that you are looking for.


I hope you found it interesting. Wishing you all a very very Happy Diwali. May this festival of Lights with your lives with happiness and prosperity Cheers

Continue Reading

Metropolitan museum of Art New York

In my last post on “One day in New York City” I wrote about my visit to the MET – the mother of all museums and a temple of art. The one on Fifth avenue that I visited, is over 2 million sqft in area and has over 5000 years of art.

In my last post on “One day in New York City” I wrote about my visit to the MET – the mother of all museums and a temple of art. The one on Fifth avenue that I visited, is over 2 million sqft in area and has over 5000 years of art. Before my visit, I had planned on seeing the Greek exhibit, Some renaissance paintings, Impressionist wing and the Manus Machina exhibit as I thought only that was possible in the four hours that I had there. But as soon as I stepped inside I became greedy, (yes, this was the FOMO that I was talking about in my previous posts) and wanted to see more. I ended up seeing both the Greek and Roman wings, the Polynesian, Americas, and a part of the Arts of Africa wing, Modern art – realism, Impressionism, a little bit of post-modern art, a portion of the Old masters section, the Manus Machina exhibit, a section of the Byzantine gallery, and the Egyptian section with the mummies and the temple. To streamline the visit, I looked only at Jewelry and accessory exhibits in the Roman, Americas, and Egyptian wing.
Here are pictures of a few favourites. You can find the pictures from the impressionist wing in my post on Expression of impressions. I apologise in advance for the dull and sometimes unsharp pictures; a lot of the exhibits had dim lighting and flash photography was not permitted.

Metropolitan museum of Art New York

Greek and Roman
These were the first two galleries that I saw and they far surpassed my expectations. Even after seeing the entire gallery I couldn’t believe the amazing craftsmanship of the jewelry that was displayed. I have studied Greek art and taught Greek ideals and costumes for a while now but truth be told I never expected them to be so well made with intricate work and luscious stones. The Intaglio rings and Signet rings of the emperors and officers in garnet and coral were fascinating.

greek jewelry

Of all the jewelry that I saw, I was most fascinated by this Greek Hair bun ornament. I have seen variations of this ( Kondai valai – Hair burn fillet) being worn in India, but I never expected to see a Greek version of it, that too it gold. The round focal is reminiscent of the traditional Indian “Naga choodamani” where a snake is the focal instead of a woman’s face. Could this have been a probable Indo-Greek Design collaboration?

greek hair ornament

Polynesia and Americas
This was the wing I didn’t even plan to see – I thin I might not find anything more than some totems or masks here. Boy, I was wrong. This was the wing that I spent the most time in and enjoyed the most. I was like watching all the ‘Treasure hunt” movies at once and being transported to an era that was mythical, rich and full of glory.

wooden mask totem
The jewelry was from various places like Panama, Costa Rica, and Columbia and warranties its own post so I’ll offer only a glimpse here. The elaborate nose rings, plain pectoral ornaments, burial masks and pendants were beyond amazing. Could the head beads have been worn by Head hunters of the period?
columbian gold jewelry
Continue Reading

September ABS – Expression of impressions

As a design student in the early 2000’s the art movement that I was most drawn to was impressionism. Everything about the movement – from how it came into existence, it journey including Neo and post impressionism, the artists, their style, and the range of subjects fascinated.

As a design student in the early 2000’s the art movement that I was most drawn to was impressionism. Everything about the movement – from how it came into existence, it journey including Neo and post impressionism, the artists, their style, and the range of subjects fascinated. The more art and design history I studied, the more I started relating to the overall Positivist philosophy of art which is the rejection of Romantic subjectivism in favor of the objective description of the ordinary world. Impressionism, Post-impressionism, Expressionism, Fauvism are all the art movements of the positivist age and are linked not just by the time period or brushstroke technique but also by the treatment of a subject that implied a certain degree of distortion. While Impressionism is more fluid and spontaneous, expressionism is more intense and emotional. Artists like Van Gogh were able to successfully bridge both.

Pebeo paint jewelry


September’s Art bead Scene challenge is to create an art bead/components or Jewelry with art beads inspired by Paula Modersohn-Becker’s “Old Woman from the Poorhouse in the Garden with Glass Ball and Poppies” which is an expressionist style of painting. While I found the colors in the painting calling to me, I somehow could not comprehend the imagery. I found it closer to Paul Gauguin’s primitivist impressionism works maybe due to the presence of brown skin tone and rust colored clothing.

You might wonder how difficult can it be to decode a picture of a woman holding flowers, but I didn’t find it compelling. So I took a leaf out of Edvard Munch’s Scream and Anxiety – the classic textbook reference in Expressionism, I decided to make pendants with streaks of colors and visual texture that is visible in Paula’s painting. Again I wasn’t very convinced by the color palette that was provided, so I proceeded to make my own from the painting. In usual design school style (where only a maximum of five colors are allowed in the color board) I picked an unconventional palette of reddish rust, muted blue, pale green, deep mustard and one neutral black.

Pebeo paint jewelry canvas

 

Expression of impressions
Beyond the given painting, my inspiration comes from me visit to the Modern art gallery – particularly the Impressionist wing at the Metropolitan museum of art. So I call my work as my Expression of impressions on my mind there.
The first pendant is based on an idea I have been wanting to try for a very long time Mini canvas like pendants. For this piece I used artists’ canvas as the base and played around with Pebeo Prisma colors that I got at Michaels. In my metal image of the inspiration picture I saw bluish purple ( I guess that was my impressionist brain mixing colors by itself) so the pendant has a large dose of bluish purple in it due to which it looks cooler than the painting. I am still exploring bail and necklace options for it (nothing seems to work) so I am open to suggestions.
 
enamelled metal pendant

I was not sure if just a colored canvas pendant would be considered a valid entry for the challenge, so I made another. I used an embossed copper circle, that was flame painted and partially enamelled with Vitreous crackle enamel (made by me at beadfest). I added pebeo paints and Ice resin jewel tints to get paints streaks and texture on it. This just has a hole on the top as I am figuring out bead options to make it into a necklace.

air chasing on copper jewelry
Continue Reading