Yellow and White Haldi Flower Jewelry

Here is a flower jewelry set that I made after a long time. Its quite a departure from my usual sets as its soft, sweet and elegant with pastel yellows and offwhite.In a culturally vibrant and diverse country as India, color and its multitude of expressions is what holds together the contrasting outlooks, lifestyles, and traditions.

Here is a flower jewelry set that I made after a long time. Its quite a departure from my usual sets as its soft, sweet and elegant with pastel yellows and offwhite.
In a culturally vibrant and diverse country as India, color and its multitude of expressions is what holds together the contrasting outlooks, lifestyles, and traditions. Color and its symbolism stands out and controls every aspect of life in India, be it religion (Saffron, white, green), politics (red, black, saffron), or festivals (multi colors). Color is entwined with Culture here and is an integral part of the rituals and traditions.
Colors like red, maroon, bright or golden yellow and green are used the most during celebrations – festivals and weddings alike. Bright, deep or dark colors are usually preferred and the only exception to that is the use of light yellow. Bright yellow is related to the intellect and is supposed to help keep you calm and cool during stressful yet auspicious occasions like weddings. It is also denotes purity, fertility and prosperity.

haldi yellow flower jewelry


Light or pale yellow considered pale or sickly by western standards is considered to be the color of sanctity, optimism and cheer here. As white is considered inauspicious, during weddings white fabrics and clothes are dipped in turmeric water which results in them becoming a light yellow color and in a lot of communities (esp in south India) these dip-dyed clothes are worn as the bridal attire during weddings. As turmeric is a known antiseptic, a fabric dipped in turmeric is considered to be a symbol of a protection barrier or threshold that keeps out evil eyes and negative vibrations.

haldi yellow flower haath phool

This is very interesting because apart from the yellowed white fabrics (dyed as described above) washed clothes or fabrics are considered impure and are hence not worn by the bride or groom during the wedding. Strangely, silk is the only fabric that is considered to be pure even when its not washed. Talking about wedding traditions I wrote about the Haldi or Pithi ceremony in one of my old flower jewelry posts. In the south Turmeric paste is applied to strings tied on the hand and the Thirumangalyam to emphasise not just the moralities of chastity and purity but also celebrate the fertility of a woman

haldi yellow flower jewellery

This set in yellow and offwhite contains a simple choker, a long raanihaar, a tikka, earrings and haath phool. It would be interesting to see how this bride styles her look with my jewelry.
I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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Bridesmaid gifts – Flower Jewelry

Bridesmaid gifts is a relatively new concept in India . Though we do buy new clothes and very rarely jewelry trinkets for our close relatives, hardly anybody will wear it for the actual wedding as it won’t be grand enough for a wedding

Bridesmaid gifts is a relatively new concept in India . Though we do buy new clothes and very rarely jewelry trinkets for our close relatives, hardly anybody will wear it for the actual wedding as it won’t be grand enough for a wedding. But with Flower Jewelry gaining popularity, many Indian and NonresidentIndian (NRI) brides have turned to Flower jewelry as Bridesmaid gifts for their pre-wedding festivities
This US based bride wanted initially Half matha pattis as gifts for her sisters and sister-in-laws to match with their green and gold outfits for her Gaye Holud Ceremony. Slowly as we got talking, the gift grew to accommodate long necklaces and matching earrings.


The challenge here was to design pieces that were grand enough to be worn to a wedding, yet not so grand that they’ll upstage the bride. Also, there had to be a small difference between two sets of design (I presume two sets were for the bride’s own sisters and the other two for her inlaws) So, out of the four two were three strand necklaces with three big and two small flowers as the focal and the other two were two strand necklaces with two big and one small flower each as a focal. In the picture below, you can see both the two strand 3mm bead necklaces with flower focals.


The green swatch that I worked with was tricky – it was an unusual green that you usually won’t find in ribbons. So I superimposed ribbon roses of 2 shades of green to arrive at the perfect color.

As these were gifts, I went with simple yet festive packaging (check them out on my Instagram page). I used hot pink earrings cards (upcycled from unused handmade paper left behind by students) with a little gold star tape and I used pink tissue paper (used by jewelry stores to wrap silver jewelry) and printed out little green Sayuri labels. They are so pretty, aren’t they?


So what did the lovely bride get for herself as Gaye Holud Jewelry? The rich red flower set with red bud roses and gold beads. It is a set with a choker with a single rose, chest length necklace, earrings, Haathphool and matha tikka (single line matha patti) or forehead ornament.


Check out my reviews page on Facebook to see what the bride has to say.


If you have ever attended a workshop at Sayuri or bought my creations or simply are a friend who has nice things to say about me and my brand, please review Sayuri on facebook to help keep up my reputation as a 5-star brand.
So what do you think of Flower Jewelry as quirky cultural bridesmaids gifts? Even if you do not follow the customs or rituals I think that these trinkets would make fun, colorful and economical gifts for friends and family.

I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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Maha Rani pink Bridal Jewelry

In Indian languages especially in Hindi, colors are named after certain objects – fruits, herbs or even nature.

In Indian languages especially in Hindi, colors are named after certain objects – fruits, herbs or even nature. For example, Sky blue is called Aasmaani (like the sky), olive green is called Mehendi (after henna), pink is called Gulabi (after a rose) and Gray is called Saleti (after slate). But them some names are peculiar and it makes it hard to trace their origins. Case in point – Rani!
Rani refers to a hot pink colour (I don’t know the story behind it, and do tell me in the comments if you know). It is more saturated than a magenta and yet darker than pink. Its vibrant, strong, saturated, rich, and full of life and maybe that is why it is called Rani or Queen (of colors). No wonder I chose it as the brand colour (albeit a slightly darker shade) of Sayuri.
Though hot pink is a very common colour in fabrics, it is very difficult to source jewelry supplies for it. A Supplier once told me that the hot pink color is very difficult to achieve while dyeing beads as they tend to lose out the vibrancy very fast and for the extra trouble, they are priced higher than similar beads of other colors.
I get a lot of requests for rani pink flower jewelry, but I turn down most of them as I find it very hard to source hot pink flowers. Here are pictures of two similar sets I made recently after a lot of hunting for materials. Take a look.

Rani pink Bridal Jewelry


After I made the first set, I realised that it look more royal than I excepted so I thought why not call it maharani pink instead of rani pink. Most dictionaries describe or Define “Maharani” as the wife of a Maharaja, an empress to an emperor but is that all, what makes one a Maharani?

Rani pink Bridal Jewelry

Most vernacular languages, have words that lose their emotion (or feeling) when translated into English. I feel that Maharani is one of them. More than a position, it is an endearment, an estimation of how beautiful someone is. Where I come from, there are endearing terms that a loved one uses to describe a girl/woman who is traditionally dressed (usually a saree and jewellery). These words will be accompanied by gazes of love (adoration), pride and most often than not , a long sigh! For instance, a father would refer to his daughter as “Rani” or queen, a boyfriend or a husband who call her his “devathai” or angel and the grandmother would call her a “Maharani” blessing her with a long and fruitful life.

Maang tikka and haathphool
Indian bridal jewellery might start at the crown of the head but a lot of importance is given to what is worn on the feet. Toerings due to their ability to compress pressure points impacting fertility have the foremost importance but anklets come a close second. In my first set, I made an exotic looking mixed flower anklet with 8 different types of flowers. The idea here is that every bride should dress up her feet as she takes the first step towards holy matrimony. Too cheesy? I thought so too!


In the first set, I made a statement Five strand Ranihaar in pink and gold with red, pink and a gold bead choker necklace with red and pink roses. I used bud roses, full roses, button roses and daisies in 3 different colors to create bracelets, rings, anklets, headpiece, armlets (first image of this post) and clips for the braid.

The second set was simpler with just the long necklace in a different pattern, a simple choker, grander headpiece, 2 flower earrings and slave bracelet with similar flowers.

Norman Mailer once said that “The highest prize in a world of men is the most beautiful woman available on your arm and living there in her heart loyal to you….”

So here‘s to all the heartfelt love and the beautiful jewelry that make gorgeous women even more fabulous– that make them the Maharanis of the world.

I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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Gaye Holud ribbon jewellery

There is saying in the teaching community that goes like this “The more time you give students to complete their work, the less productive they get; so might as well give them a sharp deadline” Why? because they are going to do it only at the last possible moment.

There is saying in the teaching community that goes like this “The more time you give students to complete their work, the less productive they get; so might as well give them a sharp deadline” Why? because they are going to do it only at the last possible moment. Of late, I have come to realise that this holds true for people in general and not just students. Case in point, this post which I was supposed to write a month back.
In January when I was knee deep in work, I got a message asking for an urgent set for a Gaye holud ceremony that was bright and colorful and to be shipped in less than a week’s time. I seldom take assignments with a very short lead time as managing the logistics of sourcing and shipping can be very stressful even if you can get the product done fast. But this time, I did.

Gaye Holud ribbon jewellery


The only way I could do it in the given time frame was by using premade ribbon flowers. We agreed to use colors like red, lemon yellow and green along with gold accents to match with a simple Daccai cotton saree – yellow with a green border. We brainstormed on a lot of different design ideas where the Pinterest board that I have on Bridal Flower jewellery came in quite handy. You can find the inspiration for this particular set here


Some designs take a lot of experimentation and a lot of time to figure out how exactly it can be put together and some are very simple that you can figure it out all in your head, even before you pick up a single tool or supply. This entire set belongs to the second category. As soon as I bought the materials I realized how I would put it together and once I started working it got done within 3-4 hours. I just had to make a few measurement corrections the next day and add one more piece to the set – the choker. Overall it was quite breezy to make it. But that is when the self-doubt started.

Gaye Holud gota jewellery

I was raised with the belief that if something goes off very smoothly or that it is too good to be true, it probably isn’t. So after making the first necklace, I got thinking – is it good? Is it wearable? Is it too bright? Is it too shiny? I have never seen anybody wear anything like it before (only seen ornaments created like this for deities) let alone make something like it. Panic! Panic!

Red, yellow and green is a very traditional Indian color combination, something that I have managed to stay away from, for all my teen and adult life. Personally, I am more of a deeps and darks kind of girl so I found this colour combination along with gold a little too bold. But my design training has taught how that in order to expand your repertoire of designs, you need to step out of your comfort zone. So I did what I normally do to boost up my confidence, research!
Gaye Holud ribbon jewellery

I read up on traditional Bangla ornaments – their names, forms and usage. I read up on Gaye holud practices and traditions, the colors, materials and textured they used and what they meant.I read that, traditionally, not just the bride but also her attendants (friends) and close family also wear red, green, and yellow colors as they symbolize purity, sanctity, fertility, prosperity, piety and strength. During the wedding, A bengali bride wear ornaments like Cheek – Choker, Taira/Tikli – Forehead ornament, Ratnachur – Haath phool (slave bracelet), shakha-Paul baala- coral and shell bangles, and kaan pasha – ear studs or kaan bala – earrings (bangle for the ear).

A Screenshot from the 2003 Movie Choker Bali, where Aishwariya Rai is seen dressed up as a Bengali Bride

Still I was left with a nagging doubt. I have only seen Bengali brides wear a tight forehead ornament (Taira- Tikle) and a Crown (mukut made of Sholapith) on the head and never a multi strand directional headpiece like what I made. On further research (and using a little bit of common sense) I figured out that this could have been the traditional style and the Taira could been a British influence as it is used to hold down the veil (orna) which is thin tulle, very different from the thick Odhnis that Brides of North and west India wear but similar to the veils of the 18th-19th century English women.

In between my research, I tried the pieces on to check for fit and for an impromptu selfie. Ok I did put on a little lipstick, eyeliner and draped my mother’s saree and took a few pics. I looked so different – like some yesteryear Maharani or Zamindarini that I started experimenting with the filters, wondering how I would look If I was dressed up like this 90, 60, or 40 years ago. I could imagine myself in a carved wooden haveli, all dressed up, waiting for an all important photographer to come take a portrait picture. Another five minutes of my life spent imagining myself as a princess and coming to the conclusion that the pieces indeed looked good.

Thus with all my fears put to rest, I completed the set. This set is made of gold gota and ribbon roses in red, yellow and green contains a long mala – necklace in tie up style, a beaded choker, round dangling disc earrings, armlets, head ornament and haath phool (slave bracelet and ring). The bride loved it and sent a message saying

I can’t thank you enough.. You have built a relationship now and I will suggest all my friends to get their gaye holud jewelry from you. Thank you so much.”

Well if that isnt enough, I dont know what is! Overall it was a very fulfilling process and I must really thank Sowmya for trusting me and giving me this opportunity to be a part of her wedding. It gave me a chance to get out of my comfort zone and learn something new. It enriched me as a designer and as a person so thanks to her for that.

Information sources
Wiseshe
Elegant Eves


I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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Tuberose jewellery for haldi

Coming next in the series of floral bridal jewellery sets, is a set created using rose and tuberose flowers. Originally meant to be a jasmine set, the design for this set was changed so many times that I have lost track of them.

Coming next in the series of floral bridal jewellery sets, is a set created using rose and tuberose flowers. Originally meant to be a jasmine set, the design for this set was changed so many times that I have lost track of them.

Often costumes and jewellery used in hit movies make a huge impact on the minds of the people, prompting them to look for identical fashions, when it comes to styling themselves. This “self designer” phenomena happens not only when a movie releases but also after it gets aired on popular TV channels. One such movie that brought flower jewellery into focus is Bahubali – A Tamil/Telugu a blockbuster fictional historic movie of epic proportions) where the female lead (Tamannah) wears an elaborate set in a romantic dream sequence duet song “Pachai thee neeyadha” (see video below). Another song from this movie that is worth watching in the jewelry context is Manohari which has brought back silver ethnic jewelry in a big way.


Naturally I got a lot of queries to make such sets but I couldnt make them, simply because I just didnt know how (Believe me I am planning to remedy this by learning it very soon). But this one person wouldnt take no for an answer. She wanted a white and red set, preferably with jasmine for her soon to be sister-in-law and we brainstormed so many different way in which we could do it weeks ahead of the function. Then it rained.

There was hardly any good jasmine available for weeks and what was available was extremely expensive. To add to that, the designs we discussed required the flowers remain as buds but the damn jasmine kept blooming everytime I tried experimenting with it. Here is one such experiment, my instagram followers would have seen it way back in December

Compared to the ones worn in the video this naturally sucked and after contacting a few learned folks I realised that the flower used is not Jasmine (Malli poo) but Wax flower (moon beam flower) also know as Nandiavattai in tamil or Chandini in Hindi. Having grown up, caring for these Nandiyavattai plants (or rather trees) till I was 18, and seeing the flower bloom endlessly I felt like a fool; how could I not have recognised it? Was there a big portion of my past that I had forgotton to help me transition into city life? The even bigger question (at that moment) was where do I find it in Chennai?
I was told that it was unavailable in Chennai, had to come from Erode, had a minimum order quantity and costs almost as much as jasmine 🙁 I was super frustrated for I remember these flowers always blooming in excess and we not knowing what to do with it. They were never worn by women and was only used as an offering to the Gods. The idea of using the buds of the flower never even struck us then.

As I was talking about all this to an expert from the field, she suggested that I try using Tuberose or Sampanghi (also called Rajnigandha) which is generally used to create scents or temple garlands. With time running out, I pitched a new look and a different design idea to the bride who thankfully accepted it and this is what I made – a set with tuberose and red rose buds consisting of a necklace, earrings, maang tikka and a haath phool.

My parents kept looking at me in a weird way while I was making the set. I guess I must have made quite a scene sitting in my couch, needle and thread in hand, surrounded by bags of tuberose, looking intently, experimenting with patterns, checking them out in the mirror every few minutes and talking to myself in the process – the things we do in the name of design!!

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Rich Bridal red floral jewelry

There is red and then there is Bridal Red. If you happen to be in India or ever attended an Indian wedding you would know that there is more that one kind of “Bridal red”.

There is red and then there is Bridal Red. If you happen to be in India or ever attended an Indian wedding you would know that there is more that one kind of “Bridal red”. You have the dark maroon, that is oozing with luxury which South Indian Brahmins (like me) prefer for our wedding saree, particularly for our Nine yard sarees that we tie the knot in. You then have the lush tomato red or a soft pinkish red that is favoured by modern day North Indian brides for their Ghagras as they want to be slightly different while still being traditional. You can find a rusty red that a groom would wear in his reception Sherwani. You have the brick red that is slightly generic but a must at weddings for a lot of guests would be attired in it. In between you would find the mother of the groom in a dominating yet subtle dull red holding the position of power. You would also find the orangish sindoor red in the skirts of the little girls running around the mandap, trying to play ‘bride’. In the midst of all this, there is one particular shade of red – rich, brilliant and royal, one that captivates your attention like no other – The Rich Indian Bridal Red.


Unlike blue, which suits all skin tones, red is a tricky color to wear. So even when brides shy away from wearing bright reds in their clothes, they use them in their accessories as it is a “Shubh or auspicious” color. A while back, I got a call from a girl who wanted to give her sister a surprise wedding gift. She had seen one of her friends wear my Red roses bridal set for her wedding (Haldi function) and had fallen in love with it. She wanted a beautiful set in red and gold for her sister as she thought she would look pretty in it, though it was not a tradition in their family to have such a function.

However She wanted it in less than a week’s time with a considerable reduction in cost to fit her budget. To begin with it seemed impossible but I didnt have the heart to say no to her because of the emotion behind it. So I figured out how to make it work and created the set. Here it is.


It is simpler compared to the first one but still contains a Necklace, a pair of earrings, haath phool ( tie up style) and Maang Tika with head chain. Indian Brides wear Mehendi or alta on their hands during their wedding but I think with this haath phool, a simple coat of nail polish will suffice. What do you think?


This set is my third bridal set involving red roses with hopefully one more on the way. I did make a pink set with real flowers and white set resembling Jasmine flowers in between. Will post them soon.

Some Indian Bridal Reds

Apart from Red, white and gold I am not aware of any distinct bridal colors from around the world, are there any important bridal colors in your culture? Please share with us in the comments.

I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

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Bridal jewellery with paper roses

Remember the Mulberry Flower earrings that I posted in the We’re all ears February challenge, well it belongs to this beautiful 10 piece paper rose jewelry set that I customised for a Bride recently for her Haldi function.Though Real flower Bridal Jewelry is traditionally worn, its not very practical to make nor wear as it dries out fast, hence paper flower jewelry is a great substitute as its light, beautiful and can be reused. Paper flowers are usually worn (on the head) during dance performance – particularly Bharathanatyam performances for this very same reason

Remember the Mulberry Flower earrings that I posted in the We’re all ears February challenge, well it belongs to this beautiful 10 piece paper rose jewelry set that I customised for a Bride recently for her Haldi function.Though Real flower Bridal Jewelry is traditionally worn, its not very practical to make nor wear as it dries out fast, hence paper flower jewelry is a great substitute as its light, beautiful and can be reused. Paper flowers are usually worn (on the head) during dance performance – particularly Bharathanatyam performances for this very same reason.

paper rose necklace and earrings

This set started of us an experimental piece as the bride’s to be sister-in-law wanted an artificial set for the Bride that resembled real flowers but was unique and looked grand. For long I had looked at scrapbooking supply sites and drooled over them, so when this opportunity came I suggested using gorgeous mulberry paper flowers that the Bride and her SIL accepted.

Bridal jewellery with paper roses

This set includes a thick choker with a pearl necklace, a long rope chain (with pearls) and a rose flower pendant, two bangles which also function as a haath phool (bangle connected to a ring), two armlets (Baajuband), 2 anklets, a pair of earrings and a forehead ornament called as a Maang Tikka.

paper rose braceletspaper rose bracelets

My client also wanted bangles to be made into Haathphool so I worked with velvet ribbon and micro roses so that it will be comfortable for the bride to wear them. Dont they look really elegant and princess like when worn? I also did the same thing with the anklets – Ribbon over sot wire embellished with pearls and roses


The armlets where the last to be made, simple yet elegant with little pearls peeking out of the roses. I ma making a very similar set as I am writing this post but with slightly different flowers and maybe couple of changes in design. I feel that these sets make a nice change to the Ribbon flower jewelry that I made before.

Angelus Sinlesius said that “A rose blooms without an explanation, she blooms because she blooms” but these flowers of mine bloom to make a Bride happy on her special day. What more can I ask for?

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Ribbon flower jewelry for Haldi function

A while back I created Real Flower jewelry for a local bride to be worn with her lehengha for her Haldi function (during her wedding). Many Brides who saw it wanted similar jewelry for their wedding but they were disappointed as real flower jewelry cannot be “shipped” and they found the option of using artificial flowers – either silk or paper not in line with their vision

A while back I created Real Flower jewelry for a local bride to be worn with her lehengha for her Haldi function (during her wedding). Many Brides who saw it wanted similar jewelry for their wedding but they were disappointed as real flower jewelry cannot be “shipped” and they found the option of using artificial flowers – either silk or paper not in line with their vision.
However, This wedding season I see a change. More and more brides and their families welcome nicely made artificial flower jewelry because it is cost effective, it can be reused, it can be shipped anywhere and it can be made in any color combination to match the bridal outfit.
Here are two very similar sets made for two different brides – One from India and the other from Australia. Though both wanted Yellow and purple combination to match with their sarees; I made subtle changes in each of the sets to better suit the individual brides. so how do I do this?

Ribbon flower jewelry for Haldi function

Custom Design Process

I normally dont undertake custom orders until and unless I know the person well, for I believe that a truly bespoke piece should reflect the personality of the wearer. But I prefer to do custom work for brides as I think what we create should be in line with their vision for their “Big day”. So when I work with brides, I ask them for pictures of the outfits they are planning to wear along with their full photo and close up face shot. This way I can gauge their body type, face shape and recommend shapes or lengths of jewelry that would suit them better. I also like to interact with them to learn more about their likes and dislikes helping me understand what it is that they are looking for. I finally show them samples and send pictures of finished work for changes before I ship the product. Its a lot of work but it is satisfying knowing that these pieces will be cherished forever in the form of wedding pictures.

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Valentine real rose ring DIY

Women love getting real flowers and jewelry from their loved ones so it a huge high when you receive a gift that combines both. While I was working on my order for real roses bridal jewelry I realised that making jewelry from real Flowers can be really refreshing

Women love getting real flowers and jewelry from their loved ones so it a huge high when you receive a gift that combines both. While I was working on my order for real roses bridal jewelry I realised that making jewelry from real Flowers can be really refreshing. It so therapeutic at the same time challenging as everything has to be designed and planned beforehand. But it is so totally worth the effort as it puts a (really) big smile on the receiver’s face.
So as its the season of love, I thought I would spread some by showing you how you can easily make a beautiful real rose ring for that special person in your life. These rings are not just for valentine’s day but can be given as spring gifts, party favours or can be made in an activity (day camp) for young girls.

Valentine real rose ring DIY

Lets gather the required Materials : flat flower, felt circle, ring base, scissors and glue. Pearls or rhinestones optional
Method :
1.Pick out a flower that is fresh, firm and shake it to see if the petals are falling out. Carefully remove any discolored petals
2. Cut off the stem and sepal making sure to leave a little in place ( to hold the petals together)
3. Glue the flower to the felt circle ( cut one as per the size of the flower) and press gently. If you so desire glue pearls, beads or rhinestones to the center of the flower. Do not apply glue on the flower it will discolor. Let it dry for 20-30 mins
4. Glue the ring base to the felt circle and let dry for 30 mins Your beautiful real rose ring is now ready to be presented or worn.

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