Why Slowly Opening Jewelry Boxes is Instagram’s Latest Rage

Late Victorian Half-Hoop ring in yellow gold featuring 4 of the chunkiest & juicy Old Mine Cut Diamonds weighing 2.58 Cts. in total. • ?For any inquiries please DM or email Larry@plattboutiquejewelry.com . . . #plattboutiquejewelry #showmeyourrings #victorian #victorianjewelry #victorianring #antiquering #vintage #vintagejewelry #vintagering #engagementring #oldminecut #oldcut #diamond #bridetobe #love #LA #vintageboutique

A post shared by Larry Platt (@plattboutiquejewelry) on Aug 25, 2017 at 10:26pm PDT

There’s always trends on Instagram. Remember when all those filters were completely necessary to add to your blurry iPhone 3 photo before posting? Then the thick, heavy white borders were very popular a few years ago. Now with Instagram Stories, I feel people are posting less on their feed (at least less unnecessary photos) and opting for a quick shot or video posted in their Story. A consistent “aesthetic” has taken over as the it-word of the time, making each post highly thought out and carefully curated. Some people love this, some people hate it. But whatever your feelings are toward this highly obsessed about app, one thing is for sure: it just keeps getting popular.

In our jewelry community on Instagram, there’s one obvious kind of post that has been sweeping everyone off their feet and giving mini heart attacks to jewelry lovers nationwide. I’m talking about the videos where someone opens up a jewelry box ever so suspensefully and ever so slowly, for a BIG REVEAL. I really don’t know who or what started this; it is hard to trace back to a particular person. I feel like Larry of Platt Boutique Jewelry has definitely been doing it the longest and has made an impact because he quite often uses this tactic in his daily postings! Larry says, “When I meet people who follow me, they say they always look forward to seeing a box video because they know it’s going to be something special.” He also states that his clients love how natural the videos feel–the item in the jewelry box is glittering away in the sunshine, untouched by photo editing and as real as it gets!

The video below is one of Larry’s all-time record holding posts, clocking in at over 98k views! This proves my inclination of how easily these types of posts can quickly become viral, which this post did just that!

Edwardian era 5-Stone Old Mine Cut Diamond #ring is boxed up and ready to go to NYC with me where it will be hand delivered to its new owner. . If you’d like to see more antique & vintage rings then come say hello to me + @thekitvintage this Saturday & Sunday @acurrentaffair vintage show in Brooklyns @industrycity . . #plattboutiquejewelry #showmeyourrings #sold #specialdelivery #nyc #brooklyn #vintage . . @nattyplatt @blanconewyork @laurelstearns @arrowandanchorantiques @circa1700

A post shared by Larry Platt (@plattboutiquejewelry) on Oct 5, 2016 at 9:35pm PDT

Others have joined in on this trend, creating some gorgeous videos of jewels being revealed by opening a box. If I had to guess why this trend is so popular, I would say that it easily resonates with people because it is almost as if they are opening the box themselves, envisioning this as a beautiful gift they are receiving. The suspense factor also plays an important part in why this is trending on Instagram.

Another antique jewelry dealer that has taken part in posting “unboxing” videos is Ismael Khan of Ishy Antiques. He is based in London and finds that these types of videos perform well for his Instagram too. Ishy says, “I’ve done five box opening videos and all five are in my overall top twenty ‘posts’ based on impressions, insights and likes for the past year. My 2 most liked posts are box openings.” If that is not clear evidence to how impactful these kinds of posts are, I don’t know what is! He also adds, “From a social media growth point of view, I believe these types of posts are popular because people have to wait to see what’s inside the box which registers views and impressions, and therefore increases engagement.”

Standing in the yogurt aisle at the supermarket filming jewellery ? This 18ct gold Art Deco onyx and diamond ring is new in today. Wouldn't it make an amazing engagement ring? UK K (US 5 1/8) and sizeable. Please DM for more information #IshyAntiques

A post shared by Ismael K (@ishyantiques) on

So the next time you’re stumped over what to post on Instagram, try your hand at the big box reveal! I’d like to recommend practicing opening the box a few times while filming FIRST before you film and post immediately. I’ve seen a few FAILS that were posted on Instagram and not done in the best way. I won’t give any examples because that would be quite rude, but I’m sure we’ve all seen them! You can even ask a friend to film while you use both hands to open the box OR get a tripod for steady filming. Not everyone has coordination and that’s ok! There’s ways of going about to help with that!

That’s what I did with the video below–I set up my camera on a tripod so I could use both hands. That seemed to work better for me at least. Another necessary part to this is getting some interesting antique boxes! I’ve seen these become quite scarce lately, but there’s always some on Instagram and eBay, although some are priced high because the seller knows how rare they’ve become! I found the hot pink one in my video below at a random antique shop in Kentucky. Talk about getting lucky in Kentucky! Always have your eyes peeled!

If you want to look down at the prettiest ring you’ve ever seen sitting on your finger, say no more. This babe is available — priced at $3200 ♥️??? Details over at @shopgemgossip

A post shared by GEM GOSSIP™ (@gemgossip) on Sep 20, 2017 at 3:28pm PDT

Have you seen this BOX REVEAL trend on your feed? Let us know a seller who does this that you enjoy watching in the comments section, I’d love to see!

xoxoGemGossip

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Why I Wear Diamonds: A Look Inside My Diamond Jewelry Collection

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After collecting jewelry for most of my life, I’ve recently realized the reason why the majority of my collection consists of diamonds. I have gone through phases where I buy and acquire, collecting several pieces at once…followed by a breakthrough period where I sell, purge and stash away. Through all of this, I’ve noticed my favorite pieces, ones I would never consider selling and never tire of, are my diamonds. There is something unique about diamonds that is slightly magical — the rarity of one single stone alone is quite breathtaking. Thinking about how it formed deep within the Earth, how it came to be, how it was mined, how it was cut, how it was sold and how it was made to fit a design; all of this fascinates me. Which is why partnering with Real is a Diamond to tell you this story seemed like a no-brainer to me — their platform has been created to educate about diamonds, their rarity, their romance and all that they stand for. As our world is forever evolving, I feel like this message can stop time, just for a moment at least, and initiate people of all walks to evaluate what is rare and authentic in their own lives. One would immediately realize that these are the best parts of our world and we should foster and protect them, as we should diamonds..

My diamond jewelry collection is easily one of the most precious things in my life. Many of my rings date back to the turn-of-the-century, so the diamonds are mostly old mine cuts and old European cuts, which take their rarity to new heights. Heirlooms like these make me stop and think what kind of legacy do I want to leave behind and what items will I pass down. Diamonds are perfect mementos that stand the test of time–they are ideal heirlooms.

Several rings shown above in my collection have been purchased or received to comemorate a special occasion or milestone in my life. As soon as I look at these particular pieces, I automatically am brought back to that moment. My 30th birthday for example, I bought myself an Edwardian diamond ring off of eBay that was probably way more money than I should have been spending at that moment, but looking back now, it was one of the best purchases ever. The ring to me is timeless in every sense, so I wear it all the time–diamonds are like that, they can be worn on any occasion. Another ring was a Christmas gift from my husband, several were to comemorate a trip or jewelry jaunt, and others were from very special people purchased by myself from their personal, private collections. These rings have so many stories to tell and that’s solely with my possession of them–I can’t imagine what their full stories reveal.

Of course the most prominent ring in the bunch is my antique diamond engagement ring. It’s the most worn of them all and most dear to me. It symbolizes my relationship with my husband, our promise to one another and is just as real and rare as our love for one another. There are over 7 billion people on this planet, and we chose each other; and while there are so many kinds of diamonds, I chose this ring as a representation of our love.

We want to know what diamond jewelry is rare and precious to you? What pieces mark a special occasion or milestone in your life? Tag them using the hashtag #RealisRare

This sponsored blog post was brought to you in collaboration with Real is a Diamond.

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How 3 Nashville Entrepreneurs Style Their Dana Seng Jewelry

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The life of an entrepreneur: forever in motion, on the go, and fast-paced. Sometimes you need your jewelry to be that way too! I’m always on the hunt for something I know I can throw on and automatically look good, something I can style with a variety of different outfits, and something that is timeless and will withstand a hectic lifestyle. The piece of jewelry that does it for me is my Dana Seng birthstone initial charm necklace, without a doubt! It goes with just about anything…when I put it on I already feel put together…and the best part is that it was made for me! I picked out the letter I wanted and the gemstone I wanted–D for Danielle (my first name) and sapphire for my birthstone (and luckily blue is a color that goes great with almost my entire wardrobe).

Dana Seng Jewelry prides itself on creating jewelry that fits this exact remedy–for “every style” and for “every woman.” I thought it would be fun to see how three different women style their own Dana Seng Jewelry pieces, so I took three Nashville entrepreneurs (myself included) and without any direction, told everyone to style their piece with what fits their lifestyle and how it fits in their everyday look. It was so interesting to see how a simple initial gemstone necklace or ring could be worn in different ways, suit unique styles and become a staple to someone’s wardrobe. One thing is for sure, we all agreed how simple, yet statement-making our birthstone initial pieces are and how much they’ve become an everyday occurrence within our style.

Let’s find out more:

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Danielle

By day, I’m writing my blog Gem Gossip, editing photos, pulling ideas and planning my next move…by night, I’m cooking the latest Blue Apron, catching up on Shameless, playing with my dogs and most likely ripping out carpet somewhere in my house. Even if there are days where I don’t leave my office, I like to at least throw on a piece of jewelry that makes me feel good and oftentimes it is my Dana Seng Jewelry initial necklace. My style is casual, always pants (I’ve never been a dress-wearer, but I’m trying) and I love a good blouse, like the one I’m wearing. I mostly wear vintage or antique jewelry, and my initial necklace from Dana Seng fits in perfectly.

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Lauren

When she’s not busy building her photography empire, Lauren Newman, a Florida-born, California-dreaming entrepreneur is exploring Nashville, always on the lookout for new places to shoot. Photography is her passion and so is traveling. Her style is romantic with an edge, often pairing a pretty dress with a leather jacket. Her Dana Seng Jewelry is an initial birthstone ring–she chose an L for her first name, done in garnets for her birth month of January. It pairs perfectly with her other gold, delicate rings and is exactly her jewelry style. She likes wearing rings when she’s out on a photoshoot because every time she clicks the camera, they sparkle!

You can follow Lauren on Instagram here.

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Alyssa

Documenting her daily outfits and inspirations has been something that has come natural for Nashville fashion blogger Alyssa. She has been writing Dreaming Trees since 2014 where her creativity flows and her bohemian style is put front and center. Her Dana Seng birthstone initial charm necklace easily transitions from her nine to five day job, to her photoshoots she executes for her blog. She chose an A for her first name set with Peridot for her August birthday in a necklace. As you can see, mixing her initial necklace with her usual Southwestern silver rings and other delicate gold necklaces fits her style and she makes it her own! Whether Alyssa is wearing a vintage dress or a new trendy designer, her Dana Seng necklace can blend with either and easily layer with other jewelry.

You can follow Alyssa on Instagram here.

– – – – – – – –

All photos by Lauren Newman Photography.

This sponsored post was brought to you in collaboration with Dana Seng Jewelry.

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My Jewel Box: Five Ring Additions to Round Out 2016

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I was giving myself a good chuckle yesterday because I’ve gotten a few comments from people asking why I stopped my YouTube videos–especially my main series Gem Gossip Read & Wear. The point of the series was to try to keep in tact a New Year’s Resolution I made last year–which was to only buy one ring per month, and also read one jewelry book per month. As with most resolutions, I started out strong–almost too strong. I knew my demise was near. Sure enough, I couldn’t keep up and bought way too many rings. Also my sister who edits and creates all the video content was having health difficulties, so that contributed to my sudden drop off from YouTube as well. Hopefully I’ll be back with something new and exciting, so stay tuned.

As the year came to a close (nearly 20 days ago, are you kidding me?!) I kind of went over board with the additions to my collection. So much so that I haven’t been keeping up with the My Jewel Box posts–so I’m compiling a bunch of my acquisitions into this one post! Five rings, to be exact–all acquired in November/December. Wanted to share the stories behind and details for those interested–BECAUSE I LOVE READING STUFF LIKE THAT. Hope you do too! 😉

My Jewel Box | Gem Gossip

This beauty was my Christmas gift from my husband this year–yes, another antique elongated diamond ring. “Don’t you have enough of those kinds of rings?!” Umm, no. I seriously cannot get enough of this style–something about it. This particular ring was found at auction from Hampton Estate Auction. It’s platinum and set with Old European cut diamonds, a 1920s piece through and through. Most of my other elongated rings are from earlier than that–so this was fun to add to the collection.

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Metal Cloud Earrings

I have a confession to make – “I am crazy about clouds and I love taking pictures of the sky!” If I could photograph anything I wanted to, I would probably photograph clouds.

I have a confession to make – “I am crazy about clouds and I love taking pictures of the sky!” If I could photograph anything I wanted to, I would probably photograph clouds. For me there is no “ordinary” cloud – every cloud is special and beautiful in its own way. I have pissed off many with this compulsion of mine, to stop, admire, and photograph clouds even when I am in the middle of something important. From dates to functions, from roadtrips to photoshoots – none have been spared. So to hear Keith Christiansen, a curator at the MET museum speak about his attachment for clouds was very satisfying.

Photographs taken at New York City, Udaipur and Chennai

At one point he explains why he takes pictures of clouds and the sky – “it is not a record of a place that I have been too but rather an emotion that I felt standing there and looking at it.” I do not think that I can summarise my feelings for the sky and clouds any better than how Keith feels.
Many, Many artists have taken inspiration from clouds, from Sunrise and sunset skies to fuel their imagination. Next only to flowers, I consider the ever changing nature of clouds as the universal definition of strong inspirational direction.
This Month’s we’re all ears challenge is all about Weather – wind patterns, clouds and rain and as inspiration Erin had provided us with Van Gogh’s Wheat Field with Cypresses that I had posted in the September ABS challenge here

I had great plans for all sorts of earrings when I started writing this post a week back and was then struck down by 102 deg fever. But I have made 2 pairs at the last moment. One is a direct realisation of cloud earring showcasing deep dark booming clouds and the other is a more stylised version of cloud movement in the evening just before the golden hour. The long stud meant to be worn as evening or party wear. Both are studs and are made of brass – brass flower stamping blanks (cut into the cloud shape) and brass wire. I have used my new texture hammer from Parawire to add interest to both pieces. I somehow like the texture on the wire better, what do you guys think?

We’re all ears – its cloudy

I have blinged up both earrings with swarovski crystals and lots of pearls. I also like how the loreals in the first earrings move a lot without making much sound, an attribute I prefer in my earrings. On hindsight, I think I should have not wrapped such heavy pearls to the earrings. As it quite long and tilts to the side (as per the design) it feels even more heavy. But it would be nice to wear it on an evening out and be the cynosure of all eyes. That’s it for this reveal folks and as I close I am going to leave you with more cloud pictures I took in the last few years all over the world.
Photographs taken at Chennai, Kathmandu, New Jersey, and Philadephia

I just realised that even though my inspiration pictures are colorful, vibrant with a happy vibe my designs are dull and melancholic, maybe reflecting my current state of mind and body. Maybe looking at all the beady baubles that the other participants made would cheer me up so I am off to visit the challenge reveal page. Why don’t you all join me ?

I hope you found it interesting
Cheers

[||||Thanks to:jewelsofsayuri blog|Special thanks to:jewelsofsayuri blog|Greetings to:jewelsofsayuri blog |Source: jewelsofsayuri|More at:jewelsofsayuri blog|

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Beadfest Summer 2016 – a retrospection

Beadfest Fall is almost upon us (from October 13-16th 2016) at Tacoma but I realise that I am yet to write about my experiences at Beadfest Summer 2016. The last month has been pretty exacting – I have been extremely sick yet was working full time.

Beadfest Fall is almost upon us (from October 13-16th 2016) at Tacoma but I realise that I am yet to write about my experiences at Beadfest Summer 2016. The last month has been pretty exacting – I have been extremely sick yet was working full time. I was the organiser of a 2 week long event with competitions and ceremonies at work and then came the navaratri display. But slowly I am getting a handle on things so without much ado here are the highlights of my beadfest workshop experience – well in two quick successive posts. Beadfest Summer 2016 happened at Oaks, Pennsylvania, near Philadelphia. From King of Prussia (where I stayed at) I had to go through the valley Forge park to get to Audoban and Oaks. The first morning I was pretty scared, for the route looked like a hill station roa d- completely green and devoid of houses or stores for a few miles but then slowly I began to enjoy it for it is impossible to find such beautiful trails in Chennai. So coming back to the workshops – I had such fantastic learning and so many experiences in four days that I cannot do it justice by by cramming it all into one post. Hence in this post I am going to only talk about the first two workshops.

Crackle Enamel necklace by sayuri


Day 1: Celestial Fusion
I couldn’t have asked for a better class to start my beadfest experience or a better teacher than Jean Van Brederode of Charmed I’m Sure Studio. Jean was very sweet and patient and her work with both Crackle Enamel and stamped solder was fantastic and very inspiring. Including me there were only five of us in the class so we got to learn and experiment a lot. At first, we learnt was to create the back piece for prong setting – cutting the plate and wire, making the bail and soldering them together using sheet solder which was all very new for me.

Then we domed another disc and enamelled it in layers. I was working with full dedication at great speed (inspite of cutting my thumb in the first 10 minutes) until I spilled a load of enamel powder on my disc and panicked. Jean calmed me down and helped me streamline it. I did a couple of firing adding colors each time that I had a fabulous piece in the end that I set and wore it immediately. I then made another piece to practice – this time using black crackle enamel.
Crackle Enamel necklace by sayuri

Some instructors do not like to part with extra supplies but Jean encouraged us to make as many pieces as we wanted in the 7-hour class which was so refreshing. I made three extra discs and 2 sets of earring charms. I also tried counter enamelling. In the Beadfest site this class was referred to as “Kiln enamelling” which troubled me as I wanted to learn torch enamelling (something that I could do at home) but it turned out to be torch enamelling only. Jean had brought a kiln but we never used it.

black Crackle Enamel by sayuri
Using black Crackle Enamel
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Metropolitan museum of Art New York

In my last post on “One day in New York City” I wrote about my visit to the MET – the mother of all museums and a temple of art. The one on Fifth avenue that I visited, is over 2 million sqft in area and has over 5000 years of art.

In my last post on “One day in New York City” I wrote about my visit to the MET – the mother of all museums and a temple of art. The one on Fifth avenue that I visited, is over 2 million sqft in area and has over 5000 years of art. Before my visit, I had planned on seeing the Greek exhibit, Some renaissance paintings, Impressionist wing and the Manus Machina exhibit as I thought only that was possible in the four hours that I had there. But as soon as I stepped inside I became greedy, (yes, this was the FOMO that I was talking about in my previous posts) and wanted to see more. I ended up seeing both the Greek and Roman wings, the Polynesian, Americas, and a part of the Arts of Africa wing, Modern art – realism, Impressionism, a little bit of post-modern art, a portion of the Old masters section, the Manus Machina exhibit, a section of the Byzantine gallery, and the Egyptian section with the mummies and the temple. To streamline the visit, I looked only at Jewelry and accessory exhibits in the Roman, Americas, and Egyptian wing.
Here are pictures of a few favourites. You can find the pictures from the impressionist wing in my post on Expression of impressions. I apologise in advance for the dull and sometimes unsharp pictures; a lot of the exhibits had dim lighting and flash photography was not permitted.

Metropolitan museum of Art New York

Greek and Roman
These were the first two galleries that I saw and they far surpassed my expectations. Even after seeing the entire gallery I couldn’t believe the amazing craftsmanship of the jewelry that was displayed. I have studied Greek art and taught Greek ideals and costumes for a while now but truth be told I never expected them to be so well made with intricate work and luscious stones. The Intaglio rings and Signet rings of the emperors and officers in garnet and coral were fascinating.

greek jewelry

Of all the jewelry that I saw, I was most fascinated by this Greek Hair bun ornament. I have seen variations of this ( Kondai valai – Hair burn fillet) being worn in India, but I never expected to see a Greek version of it, that too it gold. The round focal is reminiscent of the traditional Indian “Naga choodamani” where a snake is the focal instead of a woman’s face. Could this have been a probable Indo-Greek Design collaboration?

greek hair ornament

Polynesia and Americas
This was the wing I didn’t even plan to see – I thin I might not find anything more than some totems or masks here. Boy, I was wrong. This was the wing that I spent the most time in and enjoyed the most. I was like watching all the ‘Treasure hunt” movies at once and being transported to an era that was mythical, rich and full of glory.

wooden mask totem
The jewelry was from various places like Panama, Costa Rica, and Columbia and warranties its own post so I’ll offer only a glimpse here. The elaborate nose rings, plain pectoral ornaments, burial masks and pendants were beyond amazing. Could the head beads have been worn by Head hunters of the period?
columbian gold jewelry
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September ABS – Expression of impressions

As a design student in the early 2000’s the art movement that I was most drawn to was impressionism. Everything about the movement – from how it came into existence, it journey including Neo and post impressionism, the artists, their style, and the range of subjects fascinated.

As a design student in the early 2000’s the art movement that I was most drawn to was impressionism. Everything about the movement – from how it came into existence, it journey including Neo and post impressionism, the artists, their style, and the range of subjects fascinated. The more art and design history I studied, the more I started relating to the overall Positivist philosophy of art which is the rejection of Romantic subjectivism in favor of the objective description of the ordinary world. Impressionism, Post-impressionism, Expressionism, Fauvism are all the art movements of the positivist age and are linked not just by the time period or brushstroke technique but also by the treatment of a subject that implied a certain degree of distortion. While Impressionism is more fluid and spontaneous, expressionism is more intense and emotional. Artists like Van Gogh were able to successfully bridge both.

Pebeo paint jewelry


September’s Art bead Scene challenge is to create an art bead/components or Jewelry with art beads inspired by Paula Modersohn-Becker’s “Old Woman from the Poorhouse in the Garden with Glass Ball and Poppies” which is an expressionist style of painting. While I found the colors in the painting calling to me, I somehow could not comprehend the imagery. I found it closer to Paul Gauguin’s primitivist impressionism works maybe due to the presence of brown skin tone and rust colored clothing.

You might wonder how difficult can it be to decode a picture of a woman holding flowers, but I didn’t find it compelling. So I took a leaf out of Edvard Munch’s Scream and Anxiety – the classic textbook reference in Expressionism, I decided to make pendants with streaks of colors and visual texture that is visible in Paula’s painting. Again I wasn’t very convinced by the color palette that was provided, so I proceeded to make my own from the painting. In usual design school style (where only a maximum of five colors are allowed in the color board) I picked an unconventional palette of reddish rust, muted blue, pale green, deep mustard and one neutral black.

Pebeo paint jewelry canvas

 

Expression of impressions
Beyond the given painting, my inspiration comes from me visit to the Modern art gallery – particularly the Impressionist wing at the Metropolitan museum of art. So I call my work as my Expression of impressions on my mind there.
The first pendant is based on an idea I have been wanting to try for a very long time Mini canvas like pendants. For this piece I used artists’ canvas as the base and played around with Pebeo Prisma colors that I got at Michaels. In my metal image of the inspiration picture I saw bluish purple ( I guess that was my impressionist brain mixing colors by itself) so the pendant has a large dose of bluish purple in it due to which it looks cooler than the painting. I am still exploring bail and necklace options for it (nothing seems to work) so I am open to suggestions.
 
enamelled metal pendant

I was not sure if just a colored canvas pendant would be considered a valid entry for the challenge, so I made another. I used an embossed copper circle, that was flame painted and partially enamelled with Vitreous crackle enamel (made by me at beadfest). I added pebeo paints and Ice resin jewel tints to get paints streaks and texture on it. This just has a hole on the top as I am figuring out bead options to make it into a necklace.

air chasing on copper jewelry
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Top Ten Favorite Rings from Elisa Solomon Jewelry

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I like to call Elisa Solomon‘s jewelry designs “collectible” jewels, as they are an up-and-coming category that is creating waves in the biggest way possible. What I mean by this is simple: certain designers whose creations look best worn in multiples, all together. There is something so enchanting about stacking and collecting her designs. Each one plays off the other and the bohemian vibe that her jewelry gives off is even stronger when more is worn. Elisa uses motifs like butterflies, flowers, peace signs, hearts and animals to convey her style, along with bright, vibrant colors using multi-hued sapphires, diamonds, and other gemstones. Elisa is definitely a color-wizard when it comes to creating the right color combos using gemstones. Many of her designs have an ombré pattern, where multiple gems and shades of color are used. She also has coined the term “tie dye” with some of her pieces featuring a tie dye effect with colored gemstones. Gems like turquoise, opals, Paraiba tourmaline, multi-colored sapphires and rose cut diamonds have been some of her latest favorites to work with.

I loved every moment I had playing with Elisa’s ring designs. Choosing ten favorites was hard, but I narrowed it down to a few of her staples within her collection and added in a couple one-of-a-kind pieces. One thing I noticed right away was how happy her jewels made me feel. As soon as I put on one of her pieces, I already had a smile on my face. I seriously don’t think you could have a bad day wearing Elisa’s jewelry! The butterfly and flower rings were really cool. They were able to stack with others, but if you’re looking for your first Elisa Solomon ring purchase, those are great contenders as they are bold enough to wear alone. Adding bands like the custom turquoise eternity or the disk cuff rings are perfect stackable pieces. If you love color, you will love her multi-gem pieces and the more color, the brighter and happier the stack got!

Hope the above photos give you some stacking inspiration and goals. It would be an awesome tradition to add a piece of Elisa Solomon Jewelry to your collection each milestone or year to celebrate something special. Before you know it, you’ll have an amazing collection of sparkling, bohemian jewels. Check out each piece below for more details:

Elisa Solomon | Gem Gossip Elisa Solomon | Gem Gossip

1. The peace sign has been an iconic symbol since the late 50s. Elisa’s version of the peace sign glitters in a rainbow of gems set in 18k yellow gold. Although small, it packs a powerful punch and stands for something great! It easily stacks or fits perfectly in between her cuff rings. I personally think it would make the coolest pinky ring! Price: $680

2. These cuff rings are one of Elisa’s latest designs and they make creating a stack easier by being awesome fillers. Lots of rings are able to pair well with the cuff rings because the design has a void in the middle, ready to be filled by another ring. This one is done in 18k yellow gold and rose cut diamonds. Price: $1,720

Elisa Solomon | Gem Gossip Elisa Solomon | Gem Gossip

3. If you know me, you know I have a thing for hearts. I LOVE this heart ring from Elisa Solomon! It is dainty yet bold, set with a bright blue turquoise and ombré colored pink sapphires. The combination of blue and pink is super cute! It could represent many things and can be a symbolic piece in you collection. Price: $780

4.This ring is called the Magic Flower ring for a reason! It is truly magical! It is one of those pieces that can go with everything–just add it atop of any stack, and it tops it off in the best way possible. Take a boring ring that you have in your collection and add this ring on top of it–automatic upgrade! The opals are mystical and the band is special because it is set with rose cut diamonds and aquamarine all the way around. Price: $1,210

Elisa Solomon | Gem Gossip Elisa Solomon | Gem Gossip

5. Probably one of Elisa Solomon’s most romantic rings–this rose cut diamond heart ring set in 18k yellow gold beckons for a love story. I can see the handcrafted elements of it, which makes it slightly rustic, for those bohemian brides out there. The ideal engagement ring for sure! Price: $2,940

6. This ring is all about flower power! The center starts with a Paraiba tourmaline in the purest blue color. Each petal is set with a multitude of colored gemstones, all unique and sparkly. Such a fun ring, definitely holds its own, so you can wear it alone without stacking–BUT it can happen. Love this for a pinky ring. Price: $1,350

Elisa Solomon | Gem Gossip Elisa Solomon | Gem Gossip

7. I posted a video of this ring in my Instagram Story because it deserved to be spotlighted! With every turn, it gets better and better. The eternity style of it starts with a marquise cut turquoise set horizontally, but don’t let the front fool you! The ring is asymmetrical, with different sized stones which make up the band. What makes it even more magical is how a combination of opals, diamonds and turquoise create the band. Price: $1,760

8. Pretty little rose cut diamonds make up this beautiful ring. Dainty and elegant is written all over this piece, done in 18k yellow gold. Best part is how easily it pairs with bands and rings, making it possible to find a wedding band with ease should you choose this as your engagement ring! Price: $2,420

Elisa Solomon | Gem Gossip Elisa Solomon | Gem Gossip

9. Butterflies are the only insect I like–and one covered in gems is even better! Elisa’s butterfly ring is set with an array of colorful gemstones in 18k yellow gold. It’s such a sweet ring that easily fits into any jewelry wardrobe. Price: $950

10. Geometric shapes are quite popular and definitely trending–I love Elisa’s take on a circular disc ring. She loaded up the color and gems to create this design. The ring is done in 18k yellow gold and stacks really well with her cuff rings. Can you imagine a row of four of these rings on one hand?! So cool! Price: $1,060

This post was brought to you in collaboration with Elisa Solomon Jewelry.

Elisa Solomon Jewelry

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Types of precious metal wire

Like most jewelry makers, I started out by stringing and knotting beads and then slowly moved to wire before going on to explore the wonderful world of mixed media and metal smithing. Apart from making ear hooks, clasps, eyepins, bails or frames on a regular basis, I do the occasional viking knit or wire crochet.While I am no expert in wire work, it is important to learn to work with wire as its ridiculously easy to create your own hooks and clasps customising them every single time.However this post is not about making any products with wire but more to do with the basics of understanding wire and is aimed at beginners.

Like most jewelry makers, I started out by stringing and knotting beads and then slowly moved to wire before going on to explore the wonderful world of mixed media and metal smithing. Apart from making ear hooks, clasps, eyepins, bails or frames on a regular basis, I do the occasional viking knit or wire crochet.While I am no expert in wire work, it is important to learn to work with wire as its ridiculously easy to create your own hooks and clasps customising them every single time.
However this post is not about making any products with wire but more to do with the basics of understanding wire and is aimed at beginners. It is a culmination of my learning of many years (I still have a lot to learn) so it will include snippets from many books and websites apart from my own observations.

What is wire?
Wire is a usually thin, flexible strand of metal that can be made in many shapes, diameters and hardness. It can be finished using many processes including coating and plating and can be electrically insulated. Thin individual wires can be twisted together to create a cable. Wire, like cord, can be used for twisting, wrapping, bezel making, prong making, weaving, knitting, crochet and macrame while making jewelry


Jewelry Wire Materials
Jewelry wires can be majorly classified into three categories – Precious metal, base metal and finished wire or wire with effects. In this post, I’ll discuss only Types of precious metal wire with reference to usage and yes, availability (in India).

sterling silver bangles – Yoola Design

Silver
Most commonly used precious metal wires are pure silver and sterling silver. Sterling Silver or SS is an alloy consisting of 92.5% silver and 7.5% copper, Fine Silver is 99% pure silver while Karen hill tribe silver is 97% pure silver. Pure silver is nonreactive, less likely to cause allergic reactions and tarnishes slower. Silver that is used to make ornaments like Anklets, jhumkas (earrings), nose studs in India are 80 – 85% pure. The Cost of the wires varies from place to place and from day to day depending on the Share market. In India, any silver jeweller with a manufacturing unit will smelt and roll out silver wire in any gauge that you want (however, it might not be uniform). Locally I have found sterling silver to be more expensive than fine silver.
Argentium® sterling silver is a tarnish-resistant variety of sterling silver that consists of 92.5% silver, 1.2% germanium, and 6.3% copper. It does not develop fire scale easily and makes cleanup relatively painless. As its tarnish resistant, the wire remains shiny for a longer period but it is not very easily available and is not as cost effective as fine silver, in India. Though not as wire, Argentium is available as jewelry and as vessels in premium silver jewelry stores like VBJ and NAC in India

Infinity Wire necklace – Yoola Design

Gold & Vermeil
Though Gold wire is unavailable in India (for retail buying purposes) it is the most used wire by Indian jewellers. Internationally Gold wire is available in many karat values: 12K, 14K, 18K, and 22K. Karat (K or KT) refers to the purity of gold. 24K gold is the purest gold and is too soft and therefore alloys are preferable. Apart from yellow gold wire, rose gold (red gold) and white gold wires are also available online.

Vermeil is 24K gold electroplated over 925 sterling silver and its purity is gauged using the microns of plating (usually 2-4 microns). To be considered VERMEIL; (pronounced Vehr May) the gold must be at least 10 karat (42%) and be at least 2.5 micrometers thick. Vermeil was initially produced by fire gilding process which was then abandoned as it was considered unsafe. One gram gold is not Vermeil as the one here refers to 1 micron plating.

Palladium
Discovered in 1803 by William Hyde Wollaston, Palladium is an incredibly rare silverish metal. My only knowledge of palladium is that it is used to give white coloring to white gold and it is often suggested as an alternative to Platinum as it is less dense. Only as I was writing this article, I came to know that palladium wires are also available. Experts who have used Palladium wire, please share your knowledge in the comments section.

Silver filled and Gold Filled
Silver Filled and Gold Filled wire are made by bonding a layer of sterling silver or 14K gold onto a base metal core, which is usually a copper or a brass alloy and are finished with an anti-tarnish coating to preserve the shine. Here the layer of precious metal is much thicker than the film on plated metals. The thickness of the silver is denoted with a fraction, 1/20 or 1/10, referring to the ratio of silver to brass/copper by weight, For Example, 1/10 has a thicker layer of silver than the 1/20 variety. The core of silver-filled wire will be visible on the ends of the wire; if wire ends will be exposed, they may need electroplating to cover it, particularly if the wire is very thick. But this can be used to your advantage as you can create many usual textures by sanding or hammering. In gold filled – the ratio of gold to brass is denoted as 14/20 or 12/20 to denote the karat value of the gold 14 stand for 14-karat gold and 20 represents 1/20th or 5% of the total weight of the material.

Cleopatra necklace – Yoola Design

Silver Plated and Gold Plated
These are Copper or brass (depending on the country) wire plated with Silver or Gold and technically come under finished wires. The wires look as shiny as the real metal in the beginning but plating wears off over time often becoming yellowish, greenish or blackish in the process. On over manipulation (bending, twisting and repeated straightening) or on rough handling, the coating will chip away leaving the base metal wire visible. To create a more luxurious product, articles made of silver wire can be plated in Gold water (different from Electroplating) and is often referred to as “Gold dipping” by Indian Jewellers. A similar Rhodium dipping can also be done.

Dancing fish silver necklace – Ksemi

Tips for Working with Precious Wire
1.The first thing to do is get yourself a set of good wire working as there is no point in marring gold wire with a cheap cutter or pliers. Coat pliers with Tool magic (or equivalent potions) and use nylon jaws, fingers to wrap wherever possible.
2. Plan ahead and measure well. A precious metal wire is expensive so it is essential to use only the required length to keep your piece cost effective. It will help to prototype the piece in copper or brass before you work with expensive metals
3. Collect end bits – you can melt bits (of silver) into balls for granulation work and bigger bits can be flattened to use as dangles or ornamentation.
4. Know your metal – especially when you are about to solder or patina it! Silver or gold filled wire act differently when you try to ball them using a torch and develop firescale which is hard to remove.
5. Avoid using abrasive sandpapers or sticks on the filled and plated variety

I have also come across Platinum wire, particularly in electronic circles but I am not sure if there are independent artists who use them for jewelry. I have worked with silver, sterling, Vermeil, Filled and plated wires before, though in a limited capacity, and can safely say that you don’t require extremely advanced wire working skills to handle them. I encourage you to go for it, if you feel that it will add value to your designs. Some popular sites to buy precious metal wire are Rings-things and Cooksongold apart from etsy stores. Contact your local jeweller for silver wire and gold and silver plating on the wire.

Those were my tips on working with precious metal wire. Please share your tips for working with precious wire and your experience of working with them.

Wire Crochet jewelry pictures courtesy: Yael Falk, Yoola Designs

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